University Policies


The City University of New York Policy on Equal Opportunity and Non-Discrimination

  1. Policy On Equal Opportunity and Non-Discrimination

    The City University of New York (“University” or “CUNY”), located in a historically diverse municipality, is committed to a pol- icy of equal employment and equal access in its educational pro- grams and activities. Diversity, inclusion, and an environment free from discrimination are central to the mission of the University.

    It is the policy of the University—applicable to all colleges and units— to recruit, employ, retain, promote, and provide benefits to employees (including paid and unpaid interns) and to admit and provide services for students without regard to race, color, creed, national origin, ethnicity, ancestry, religion, age, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth and related conditions), sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, marital status, partnership status, disability, genetic information, alienage, citizenship, military or veteran status, status as a victim of domestic violence/stalking/sex offenses, unemployment status, or any other legally prohibited basis in accordance with federal, state and city laws.

    (1) It is also the University’s policy to provide reasonable accommodations when appropriate to individuals with disabilities, individuals observing religious practices, employees who have pregnancy or childbirth-related medical conditions, or employees who are victims of domestic violence/stalking/sex offenses.

    This Policy also prohibits retaliation for reporting or opposing discrimination, or cooperating with an investigation of a discrimination complaint.

    (2) As a public university system, CUNY adheres to federal, state and city laws and regulations regarding non-discrimination and affirmative action. Should any federal, state or city law or regulation be adopted that prohibits discrimination based on grounds or characteristics not included in this Policy, discrimination on those additional bases will also be prohibited by this Policy.

Prohibited Conduct Defined

Discrimination is treating an individual differently or less favorably because of his or her protected characteristics—such as race, color, religion, sex, gender, national origin, or any of the other bases prohibited by this Policy.

Harassment is a form of discrimination that consists of unwelcome conduct based on a protected characteristic that has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work or academic performance or creating an intimidating, hostile or abusive work or academic environment. Such conduct can be spoken, written, visual, and/or physical. This policy covers prohibited harassment based on all protected characteristics other than sex. Sex-based harassment and sexual violence are covered by ”The City University of New York Policy on Sexual Misconduct” on page 246.

  1. Discrimination Retaliation Complaints

    The City University of New York is committed to addressing discrimination and retaliation complaints promptly, consistently and fairly. There shall be a Chief Diversity Officer at every college or unit of the University, who shall be responsible for, among other things, addressing discrimination and retaliation complaints under this Policy. There shall be procedures for making and investigating such complaints, which shall be applicable at each unit of the University.

  2. Academic Freedom

    This policy shall not be interpreted so as to constitute interference with academic freedom.

  3. Responsibility For Compliance

    The President of each college of the University, the CUNY Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Operating Officer, and the Deans of the Law School, Graduate School of Journalism, School of Public Health and School of Professional Studies and Macaulay Honors College, have ultimate responsibility for overseeing compliance with these policies at their respective units of the University. In addition, each vice president, dean, director, or other person with managerial responsibility, including department chairpersons and executive officers, must promptly consult with the Chief Diversity Officer at his or her college or unit if he or she becomes aware of conduct or allegations of conduct that may violate this policy. All members of the University community are required to cooperate in any investigation of a discrimination or retaliation complaint.

Part of Policies and Procedures adopted and approved effective November 27, 2012, Cal.No.4; and revised policy amended and adopted December 1, 2014, Cal. No. C., with effective date of January 1, 2015; Cal. Item C.

Complaint Procedures Under CUNY’s Policy On Equal Opportunity and Non-Discrimination

  1. Reporting Discrimination And/Or Retaliation

    The University is committed to addressing discrimination and/or retaliation complaints promptly, consistently and fairly.

    Members of the University community, as well as visitors, may promptly report any allegations of discrimination or retaliation to the individuals set forth below:

    A. Applicants, employees, visitors and students with discrimination complaints should raise their concerns with the Chief Diversity Officer at their location.

    B. Applicants, employees, visitors and students with com- plaints of sexual harassment or sexual violence, including sexual assault, stalking, domestic and intimate violence, should follow the process outlined in “The City University of New York Policy on Sexual Misconduct”.

    C. There are separate procedures under which applicants, employees, visitors and students may request and seek review of a decision concerning reasonable accommodations for a disability, which are set forth in CUNY’s “Reasonable Accommodations and Academic Adjustments”.

  2. Preliminary Review Of Employee, Student, Or Visitor Concerns

    Individuals who believe they have experienced discrimination and/or retaliation should promptly contact the Chief Diversity Officer at their location to discuss their concerns, with or without filing a complaint. Following the discussion, the Chief Diversity Officer will inform the complainant of the options available. These include seeking informal resolution of the issues the complainant has encountered or the college conducting a full investigation. Based on the facts of the complaint, the Chief Diversity Officer may also advise the complainant that his or her situation is more suitable for resolution by another entity within the University.

  3. Filing A Complaint

    Following the discussion with the Chief Diversity Officer, individuals who wish to pursue a complaint of discrimination and/ or retaliation should be provided with a copy of the University’s complaint form. Complaints should be made in writing whenever possible, including in cases where the complainant is seeking an informal resolution.

  4. Informal Resolution

    Individuals who believe they have been discriminated or retaliated against may choose to resolve their complaints informally. Informal resolution is a process whereby parties can participate in a search for fair and workable solutions. The parties may agree upon a variety of resolutions, including but not limited to modification of work assignment, training for a department, or an apology. The Chief Diversity Officer will determine if informal resolution is appropriate in light of the nature of the complaint. Informal resolution requires the consent of both the complainant and the respondent and suspends the complaint process for up to thirty (30) calendar days, which can be extended upon consent of both parties, at the discretion of the Chief Diversity Officer.

    Resolutions should be agreed upon, signed by, and provided to both parties.  Once both parties reach an informal agreement, it is final. Because informal resolution is voluntary, sanctions may be imposed against the parties only for a breach of the executed voluntary agreement.

    The Chief Diversity Officer or either party may at any time, prior to the expiration of thirty (30) calendar days, declare that attempts at informal resolution have failed. Upon such notice, the Chief Diversity Officer may commence a full investigation.

    If no informal resolution of a complaint is reached, the complainant may request that the Chief Diversity Officer conduct a full investigation of the complaint.

  5. Investigation

    A full investigation of a complaint may commence when it is warranted after a review of the complaint, or after informal resolution has failed.

    It is recommended that the intake and investigation include the following, to the extent feasible:

    a. Interviewing the complainant. In addition to obtaining information from the complainant (including the names of any possible witnesses), the complainant should be informed that an investigation is being commenced, that interviews of the respondent and possibly other people will be conducted, and that the President(2) will determine what action, if any, to take after the investigation is completed.

    b. Interviewing the respondent. In addition to obtaining information from the respondent (including the names of any possible witnesses), the respondent should be informed that a complaint of discrimination has been received and should be provided with a written summary of the complaint unless circumstances warrant otherwise. Additionally, the respondent should  be informed that an investigation has begun, which may include interviews with third parties, and that the President will determine what action, if any, to take after the investigation is completed. A respondent employee who is covered by a collective bargaining agreement may consult with, and have, a union representative present during the interview.
    The respondent must be informed that retaliation against any person who files a complaint of discrimination, participates in an investigation, or opposes a discriminatory employment or educational practice or policy is prohibited under this policy and federal, state, and city laws. The respondent should be informed that if retaliatory behavior is engaged in by either the respondent or anyone acting on his/her behalf, the respondent may be subject to disciplinary charges, which, if sustained, may result in penalties up to and including termination of employment, or permanent dismissal from the University if the respondent is a student.

    c. Reviewing other evidence. The Chief Diversity Officer should determine if, in addition to the complainant, the respondent, and those persons named by them, there are others who may have relevant information regarding the events in question, and speak with them. The Chief Diversity Officer should also review documentary evidence that may be relevant to the complaint.

  6. Withdrawing a Complaint

    A complaint of discrimination may be withdrawn at any time during the informal resolution or investigation process. Only the complainant may withdraw a complaint. Requests for withdrawals must be submitted in writing to the Chief Diversity Officer. The University reserves the right to continue with an investigation if it is warranted. In a case where the University decides to continue with an investigation, it will inform the complainant.

    In either event, the respondent must be notified in writing that the complainant has withdrawn the complaint and whether University officials have determined that continuation of the investigation is warranted for corrective purposes.

  7. Timeframe

    While some complaints may require extensive investigation, whenever possible, the investigation of a complaint should be completed within sixty (60) calendar days of the receipt of the com- plaint.

  8. Action Following Investigation of a Complaint

    a. Promptly following the completion of the investigation, the Chief Diversity Officer will report his or her findings to the President. In the event that the respondent or complainant is a student, the Chief Diversity Officer will also report his or her findings to the Chief Student Affairs Officer.

    b. Following such report, the President will review the complaint investigation report and, when warranted by the facts, authorize such action as he or she deems necessary to properly correct the effects of or to prevent further harm to an affected party or others similarly situated. This can include commencing action to discipline the respondent under applicable University Bylaws or collective bargaining agreements.

    c. The complainant and the respondent should be apprised in writing of the outcome and action, if any, taken as a result of the complaint.

    d. The President will sign a form that will go into each investigation file, stating what, if any, action will be taken pursuant to the investigation.

    e. If the President is the respondent, the Vice Chancellor of Human Resources Management will appoint an investigator who will report his/her findings to the Chancellor. The Chancellor will determine what action will be taken. The Chancellor’s decision will be final.

  9. Immediate Prevention Action

    The President may take whatever action is appropriate to protect the college community in accordance with applicable Bylaws and collective bargaining agreements.

  10. False And Malicious Accusations

    Members of the University community who make false and malicious complaints of discrimination, as opposed to complaints which, even if erroneous, are made in good faith, will be subject to disciplinary action.

  11. Anonymous  Complaints

    All complaints will be taken seriously, including anonymous complaints. In the event that a complaint is anonymous, the com- plaint should be investigated as thoroughly as possible under the circumstances.

  12. Responsibilities

    a. Responsibilities of the President

    • Appoint a Chief Diversity Officer responsible for addressing complaints under this Policy

    • Ensure that the Chief Diversity Officer is fully trained and equipped to carry out his/her responsibilities.

    • Ensure that managers receive training on the Policy.

    • Annually disseminate the Policy and these Procedures to the entire college community and include the names, titles and contact information of all appropriate resources at the college. Such information should be widely disseminated, including placement on the college website

    b. Responsibilities of Managers

    Managers must take steps to create a workplace free of discrimination, harassment and retaliation, and must take each and every complaint seriously. Managers must promptly consult with the Chief Diversity Officer if they become aware of conduct that may violate the Policy.

    For purposes of this policy, managers are employees who either (a) have the authority to make tangible employment decisions with regard to other employees, including the authority to hire, fire, promote, compensate or assign significantly different responsibilities; or (b) have the authority to make recommendations on tangible employment decisions that are given particular weight. Managers include vice presidents, deans, directors, or other persons with managerial responsibility, including, for purposes of this policy, department chairpersons and executive officers.

    c. Responsibilities of the University Community-at-Large

    • Members of the University community who become aware of allegations of discrimination or retaliation should encourage the aggrieved individual to report the alleged behavior.

    • All employees and students are required to cooperate in any investigation.

For the full CUNY Equal Opportunity and Non-Discrimination Policy see: http://www2.cuny.edu/about/administration/offices/legal-affairs/policies-procedures/equal-opportunity-and-non- discrimination-policy/

(1) These Procedures govern any complaint of discrimination and/or retaliation, except complaints of sexual harassment and sexual violence, which are covered by CUNY’s Sexual Misconduct Policy. These procedures are applicable to all of the units and colleges of the University. The Hunter College Campus Schools may make modifications to these procedures, subject to approval by the University, as appropriate to address the special needs of their elementary and high school students.
These Procedures are intended to provide guidance for implementing the University Policy on Equal Opportunity and Non-Discrimination. These Procedures do not create any rights or privileges on the part of any others.
The University reserves the right to alter, change, add to, or delete any of these procedures at any time without notice.

(2 ) References to the President in these Procedures refer to the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Operating Officer and the Deans of the Law School, Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Public Health, School of Professional Studies and Macaulay Honors College, wherever those units are involved, rather than a college.

Some Relevant Laws Concerning Non-Discrimination and Equal Opportunity

Section 1324b of the Immigration and Nationality Act prohibits employers from intentional employment discrimination based upon citizenship or immigration status, national origin, and unfair documentary practices or “document abuse” relating to the employment eligibility verification or Form I-9 process. Document abuse prohibited by the statute includes improperly requesting that an employee produce more documents than required by the I-9 form, or a particular document, such as a “green card”, to establish the employee’s identity and employment authorization; improperly rejecting documents that reasonably appear to be genuine during the I-9 process; and improperly treating groups of applicants differently when completing the I-9 form.
Executive Order 11246, as amended, prohibits discrimination in employment by all institutions with federal contracts and requires affirmative action to ensure equal employment opportunities.
Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, prohibits discrimination in employment (including hiring, upgrading, salaries, fringe benefits, training, and other terms, conditions, and privileges of employment) on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, or sex.
Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits discrimination or the denial of benefits because of race, color, or national origin in any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.
Equal Pay Act of 1963, as amended, requires that men and women performing substantially equal jobs in the same workplace receive equal pay.
Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 prohibits discrimination or the denial of benefits based on sex in any educational program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.
Age Discrimination in Employment Act, as amended, prohibits discrimination against individuals who are age 40 or older.
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 defines and forbids acts of discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities in employment and in the operation of programs and activities receiving federal financial assistance.
Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 requires federal contractors and subcontractors to take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities.
Vietnam Era Veterans’ Readjustment Act of 1974, as amended, requires government contractors and subcontractors to take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment disabled and other protected veterans.
Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act of 1994, as amended, prohibits employment discrimination based on military status and requires reemployment following military service in some circumstances.
Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended, prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability.
Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 prohibits employment discrimination based on genetic information.
New York City Human Rights Law prohibits discrimination based on age (18 and older), race, creed, color, national origin, gender (including gender identity and expression), disability, marital status, partnership status, sexual orientation, alienage or citizen- ship status, arrest or conviction record, unemployment status, or status of an individual as a victim of domestic violence, sex offenses or stalking.
New York City Workplace Religious Freedom Act requires an employer to make accommodation for an employee’s religious needs.
New York State Education Law Section 224-a requires institutions of higher education to make accommodations for students who are unable to attend classes or take examinations due to their religious beliefs.
New York State Human Rights Law prohibits discrimination based on race, creed, color, national origin, sexual orientation, military status, sex, age (18 and older), marital status, domestic violence victim status, disability, predisposing genetic characteristics or prior arrest or conviction record.
New York City Pregnant Workers Fairness Act provides that employers provide pregnant employees with reasonable accommodations for the employee’s pregnancy, childbirth, or a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth.

Reasonable Accommodations and Academic Adjustments

The City University of New York (“CUNY”) is committed to providing reasonable accommodations and academic adjustments to allow qualified individuals the opportunity to participate in programs, activities and employment. CUNY recognizes that there may be times when employees and their supervisors, as well as students (1) and their instructors, can resolve accommodation requests informally. However, in many cases, such requests require a more formal process with the request being made to and considered by a designated decision-maker, with the opportunity for an appeal, as provided for in these procedures.

The following procedures apply to reasonable accommodations and academic adjustments in connection with:

  • a disability,

  • pregnancy, childbirth, or a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth,

  • religious practices, and

  • status as a victim of domestic violence, sex offense or stalking.

(1) For the purpose of these procedures, “students” refers to students and prospective students.

CUNY will thoroughly review all requests on a case-by-case basis in accordance with applicable federal, state and New York City law.
CUNY prohibits retaliation against individuals for requesting reasonable accommodations or academic adjustments, appealing decisions concerning such requests, or for making or participating in claims of discrimination.
All requests for accommodations and academic adjustments, and all supporting documentation, including but not limited to medical information, are considered confidential and will be shared with college officials only on a need-to-know basis. Such documentation will only be used to evaluate the requested accommodation. Employee and applicant accommodation documentation will be kept in a separate file in the Office for Human Resources or the Office of Recruitment and Diversity, depending on which office is evaluating the accommodation request. Student accommodation documentation will be kept in the Office for Student Disability Services, the Office of Student Affairs, or the Office of Recruitment and Diversity, depending on which office is evaluating the accommodation request.

For the full policy see: http://www2.cuny.edu/about/administration/offices/legal-affairs/policies-procedures/reasonable-accommodations-and-academic-adjustments

Accommodations Based on Status as a Victim of Domestic Violence, Sex Offense, or Stalking

Individuals requesting an accommodation based on their status as a victim of domestic violence, sex offense, or stalking should contact the Title IX Coordinator (Belinda Delgado, Esq.) located in the Administration Building Room 413, (718) 281-5755. The Title IX Coordinator, or a designee, and the individual will engage in an interactive process with the goal of finding an acceptable accommodation. The Title IX Coordinator, or a designee, in appropriate situations, may develop a workplace safety plan as described in the CUNY Domestic Violence and The Workplace Policy. Individuals may be required where appropriate to submit an intake form and/ or provide appropriate documentation to support their status as a victim of domestic violence, sex offense or stalking and to help the College or unit determine a reasonable accommodation.

For the full policy see: http://www2.cuny.edu/about/administration/offices/legal-affairs/policies-procedures/reasonable-accommodations-and-academic-adjustments/accommodations-based-on-status/

Accommodations Based on Pregnancy, Childbirth or a Related Medical Condition

A.  Student Accommodations and Academic Adjustments

Students requesting an accommodation or academic adjustment based on pregnancy, childbirth or a related medical condition should contact the Office of Student Disability Services. Students may be asked to complete an intake form and provide supporting documentation. The student and the Director of Student Disability Services, or a designee, will engage in an interactive process, which may include considering a number of factors, such as the student’s limitations and the nature and requirements of the academic program, with the goal of finding an acceptable accommodation or academic adjustment. The Director of Student Disability Services may, when necessary, consult with appropriate college officials, such as the instructor or Provost, to determine program requirements and possible accommodations and adjustments. Reasonable accommodations or academic adjustments may include, but are not limited to, granting leaves of absence, providing take-home tests to students who are bedridden or homebound, allowing make-up tests and papers, or scheduling a meeting with the instructor for a student who had to miss class because of medical appointments or medical complications in order to make up missed content. A grant or denial of the request must be made as soon as practicable, taking into account the urgency of the request, and sent to the student in writing, either stating the accommodation, or for denials, the reason(s) the request was denied.

B.  Applicant Accommodations

Applicants for employment requesting an accommodation based on pregnancy, childbirth or a related medical condition should contact the Office of Human Resources at the College or unit where they are applying. Classified civil service candidates who are required to take an exam or attend a hiring pool and are seeking an accommodation should follow the written instructions provided on the exam application, hiring pool instructions, or contact the HR Advisory Services unit in the Office of Human Resources Management in the Central Office.

C.  Employee  Accommodations

  1. Employees requesting an accommodation based on pregnancy, childbirth or a related medical condition should contact the Office of Human Resources at  their College or unit. Employees may be required to submit an intake form. The employee and the Director of Human Resources, or a designee, will engage in an interactive process, also called a cooperative dialogue, which may include a consideration of a number of factors, such as the employee’s limitations and the job functions and requirements, with the goal of finding an acceptable accommodation. The Director of Human Resources, or a designee, will initiate a cooperative dialogue even when an employee does not make an accommodation request when the College has (1) knowledge that the employee’s performance at work has been affected or that her behavior at work could lead to an adverse employment action and (2) a reasonable basis to believe that the issue is related to pregnancy, childbirth or a related medical condition. Reasonable accommodations may include, but are not limited to, granting frequent bathroom breaks, providing the employee with a specialized chair, granting leaves of absence, changing work schedules to accommodate doctor’s visits, temporary shift reassignments, providing light duties or assistance with manual labor for a period of time, or temporarily reassigning the employee to a vacant position for which she is qualified. A grant or denial of the employee’s request must be made as soon as practicable, taking into account  the urgency of the request, and sent to the employee in writing, either stating the accommodation, or for denials, the reason(s) the request was denied.

  2. Employees may be required to submit medical documentation when requesting: (a) time away from work, including for medical appointments, other than the presumptive six (for a vaginal delivery) to eight (for  a caesarian section) week period following childbirth for recovery from childbirth, or (b) to work from home, either on an intermittent or a long-term basis. This requirement does not affect medical documentation requirements related to leave taken pursuant to the Family Medical Leave Act or other disability plans or policies.

The full policy can be accessed at: http://www2.cuny. edu/about/administration/offices/legal-affairs/policies- procedures/reasonable-accommodations-and-academic-adjustments/v-accommodations/

The Affirmative Action Plan at Queensborough Community College

The Affirmative Action Plan at Queensborough Community College applies to a full range of concerns. Copies of the College Affirmative Action Plan may be obtained in the College Library, Reference Section. Students who have a question or a complaint concerning affirmative action policy should contact the Vice President for Student Affairs Room L-412 (718) 631-6351 or the College Chief Diversity/Compliance Officer, Room A-309 (718) 631- 6391, http://www1.cuny.edu/sites/title-ix/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2014/01/PEONon-Discrimination12.4.2014.pdf

Section 504 Regulations Concerning Disability

In accordance with Section 504 of the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, the College adheres to the law that states in part that:

“No otherwise qualified individual… shall, solely by reason of his/her disability, be excluded from the participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any pro- gram or activity receiving federal assistance.”

Students with disabilities can receive assistance concerning access and needs for accommodation from the Office of Services for Students with Disabilities and the Office of Health Services. Reasonable accommodations for students with documented disabilities on file in the Office of Services for Students with Disabilities are determined on a case-by-case basis. Employees and students who have a question or concern regarding requests for reason- able accommodation may contact the Chief Diversity/Compliance Officer, who also acts as the Section 504 Coordinator, Room A-309 (718-631-6391). A summary of the Section 504 Regulations may be found in the College Affirmative Action Plan, available in the Reference Section of the College Library.

The City University of New York Policy on Sexual Misconduct

I. Policy Statement

Every member of The City University of New York (“CUNY”) community, including students, employees and visitors, deserves the opportunity to live, learn and work free from Sexual Misconduct (sexual harassment, gender-based harassment and sexual violence). Accordingly, CUNY is committed to:

  1. Defining conduct that constitutes prohibited Sexual Misconduct;

  2. Providing clear guidelines for students, employees and visitors on how to report incidents of Sexual Misconduct and a commitment that any complaints will be handled respect- fully;

  3. Promptly responding to and investigating allegations of Sexual Misconduct, pursuing disciplinary action when appropriate, referring the incident to local law enforcement when appropriate, and taking action to investigate and address any allegations of retaliation;

  4. Providing ongoing assistance and support to students and employees who make allegations of Sexual Misconduct;

  5. Providing awareness and prevention information on Sexual Misconduct, including widely disseminating this policy, as well as a “students’ bill of rights” and implementing training and educational programs on Sexual Misconduct to college constituencies; and

  6. Gathering and analyzing information and data that will be reviewed in order to improve safety, reporting, responsiveness and the resolution of incidents.

    This is the sole policy at CUNY addressing Sexual Misconduct and is applicable at all college and units at the University. It will be interpreted in accordance with the principles of academic freedom adopted by CUNY’s Board of Trustees.


The CUNY community should also be aware of the following CUNY policies:

In addition, campus crime statistics, including statistics relating to sexual violence, which CUNY is required to report under the Jeanne Clery Act, are available from the Office of Public Safety at each college and/or on its Public Safety website.

II.  Scope of This Policy

This policy governs the conduct of (i) all the members of CUNY’s community, including employees and students, and (ii) non-members of CUNY’s community who interact with members of the CUNY community (hereinafter “visitors’). Visitors are both protected by and subject to this policy. A non-member may make a complaint of or report a violation of this policy committed by a member of CUNY’s community. A non-member may also be subject to restrictions for failing to comply with this policy. This policy applies to conduct that occurs on and off CUNY property.

III.   Definitions

a.  Affirmative Consent is a knowing, voluntary and mutual decision among all participants to engage in sexual activity. Consent can be given by words or actions, as long as those words or actions create clear permission regarding willingness to engage in the sexual activity. Silence or lack of resistance, in and of itself, does not demonstrate consent. The definition of consent does not vary based upon a participant’s sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression.
Consent to any sexual act or prior consensual sexual activity between or with any party does not necessarily constitute consent to any other sexual act.
In order to give consent, one must be of legal age (17 years or older).
Consent is required regardless of whether the person initiating the act is under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol.
Consent cannot be given when a person is incapacitated, which occurs when an individual lacks the ability to knowing- ly choose to participate in sexual activity. Incapacitate may be caused by lack of consciousness or being asleep, being involuntarily restrained, or if the individual otherwise cannot consent. Depending on the degree of intoxication, someone who is under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or other intoxicants may be incapacitated and therefore unable to consent.
Consent cannot be given when it is the result of any coercion, intimidation, force, or threat of harm.
Consent may be initially given but withdrawn at any time. When consent is withdrawn or no can longer be given, sexual activity must stop.

b.  Complainant refers to the individual who alleges that she/ he has been the subject of Sexual Misconduct, and can be  a CUNY student, employee (including all full-time and part-time faculty and staff), or visitor. Under this policy, the alleged incident(s) may have been brought to the college’s attention by someone other than the complainant.

c.  Complaint is an allegation of Sexual Misconduct made under this policy.

d.  Confidentiality is the commitment not to share any identifying information with others, except as required by law in emergency circumstances (such as risk of death or serious bodily harm). Confidentiality may only be offered by individuals who are not legally required to report known incidents of Sexual Misconduct to college officials. Licensed mental health counselors, medical providers & pastoral counselors may offer confidentiality.

e.  Dating Violence is violence or sexual assault committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim. The existence of such a relationship is determined based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship and the frequency of the interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. Dating violence can be a single act or a pattern of behavior, based on the frequency, nature, and severity of the conduct. A relationship may be romantic or intimate regardless of whether the relationship was sexual in nature. Dating violence includes the threat of sexual or physical abuse.

f.  Domestic Violence is any violence or sexual assault commit- ted by
i. a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim;
ii. a person with whom the victim shares a child;
iii. a person who cohabits or cohabited with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner; or
iv. anyone else covered by applicable domestic violence laws. Domestic violence can be a single act or a pattern of behavior, based on the frequency, nature, and severity of the conduct.

g.   Forcible Touching/Fondling is intentionally touching the sexual or other intimate parts of another person without the latter’s consent for the purpose of degrading or abusing such person, or for the purpose of gratifying the actor’s sexual desire.

h.  Gender-Based Harassment is unwelcome conduct of a non- sexual nature based on an individual’s actual or perceived sex, including conduct based on gender identity, gender expression, and nonconformity with gender stereotypes that is sufficiently serious to adversely affect an individual’s participation in employment, education or other CUNY activities. The effect will be evaluated based on the perspective of a reasonable person in the position of the complainant. An example of gender-based harassment would be persistent mocking or disparagement of a person based on a perceived lack of stereotypical masculinity or femininity.

i.  Intimate Partner Violence (“IPV”) includes both Domestic Violence and Dating Violence.

j.   Managers are employees who have authority to make tangible employment decisions with regard to other employees, including the authority to hire, fire, promote, compensate or assign significantly different responsibilities.

k.   Pastoral counselor. A person who is associated with a religious order or denomination, recognized by that order or denomination as someone who provides confidential counseling, and functioning within the scope of that recognition.

l. Privacy is the assurance that the college will only reveal information about a report of Sexual Misconduct to those who need to know the information in order to carry out their duties or responsibilities or as otherwise required by law. Individuals who are unable to offer the higher standard of confidentiality under law, but who are still committed to not disclose information more than necessary, may offer privacy.

m. Rape and Attempted Rape is the penetration or attempted penetration, no matter how slight, of any body part by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of that person.

n. Respondent refers to the individual who is alleged to have committed Sexual Misconduct against a CUNY student, employee, or visitor.

o. Retaliation is adverse treatment of an individual as a result of that individual’s reporting Sexual Misconduct, assisting someone with a report of Sexual Misconduct, opposing in a reasonable manner an act or policy believed to constitute Sexual Misconduct, or participating in any manner in an investigation or resolution of a Sexual Misconduct report. Adverse treatment includes threats, intimidation and reprisals by either a complainant or respondent or by others such as friends or relatives of either a complainant or respondent.

p.  Sexual Activity is

  • contact between the penis and the vulva or the penis and the anus;

  • contact between the mouth and the penis, the mouth and the vulva, or the mouth and the anus;

  • penetration, however slight, of the of the anal or genital opening of another by a hand or finger or by any object, with an intent to abuse, humiliate, harass, degrade, or arouse or gratify the sexual desire of any person; or intentional touching, either directly  or through the clothing, of the genitalia, anus, groin, breast, inner thigh, or buttocks of any person with an intent to abuse, humiliate, harass, degrade, or arouse or gratify the sexual desire of any person.

q.  Sexual Assault is any form of sexual activity that occurs without consent.

r.  Sex Discrimination is treating an individual differently or less favorably because of sex, including sexual orientation, gender or gender identity (including transgender status), as well as pregnancy, childbirth and related medical conditions. Examples of sex discrimination include giving a student a lower grade, or failing to hire or promote an employee, based on their sex.

s.  Sexual Harassment is unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature, including but not limited to unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal, nonverbal, graphic and electronic communications or physical conduct of a sexual nature when:
i. submission to or rejection of such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a condition of an individual’s employment or academic standing or is used as the basis for employment decisions or for academic evaluation, grades, or advancement (quid pro quo); or
ii. such conduct is sufficiently serious that it alters the conditions of, or has the effect of substantially interfering with, an individual’s educational or work experience by creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment (hostile environment). The effect will be evaluated based on the perspective of a reasonable per- son in the position of a complainant.
Conduct is considered “unwelcome” if the individual did not request or invite it and considered the conduct to be undesirable or offensive.
While it is not possible to list all circumstances that might constitute sexual harassment, the following are some examples of conduct that might constitute sexual harassment depending on the totality of the circumstances:
iii. Inappropriate or unwelcome physical contact or suggestive body language, such as touching, groping, patting, pinching, hugging, kissing, or brushing against an individual’s body;
iv. Verbal abuse or offensive comments of a sexual nature, including sexual slurs, persistent or pervasive sexually explicit statements, questions, jokes or anecdotes, degrading words regarding sexuality or gender, suggestive or obscene letters, notes, or invitations;
v. Visual displays or distribution of sexually explicit drawings, pictures, or written materials; o
vi. Undue and unwanted attention, such as repeated inappropriate flirting, staring, or making sexually suggestive gestures.

t.  Sexual Misconduct is sexual harassment, gender-based harassment or sexual violence, as defined in this policy.

u.   Sexual Violence includes:

  1. Sexual activity without affirmative consent, such as sexual assault rape/attempted rape, and forcible touching/fondling;

  2. Dating, domestic and intimate partner violence;

  3. Stalking as defined below; and

  4. Voyeurism, as defined below.

v. Stalking is intentionally engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that:

  1. Is likely to cause reasonable fear of material harm to the physical health, safety or property of such person, a member of such person’s immediate family or a third party with whom such person is acquainted; or causes material harm to the mental or emotional health of such person, where such conduct consists of following, telephoning or initiating communication or contact with such person, a member of such person’s immediate family or a third party with whom such person is acquainted; or

  2. Is likely to cause such person to reasonably fear that  her/his employment, business or career is threatened, where such conduct consists of appearing, telephoning or initiating communication or contact at such person’s place of employment or business, and the actor was previously clearly informed to cease that conduct.

Where stalking is directed at an individual with whom  the perpetrator has, had, or sought some form of sexual or romantic relationship, it will be addressed under this Policy. Stalking that lacks a sexual or gender-based nexus may be addressed under the Code of Conduct.

w. Supervisors are employees who are not managers, but have  a sufficient degree of control over the working conditions of one or more employees, which might include evaluating their performance and making recommendations for changes in employment status that are given particular weight.

x.  Visitor is an individual who is present at a CUNY campus or unit but is not a student or an employee.

y.  Voyeurism is unlawful surveillance and includes acts that violate an individual’s right to privacy in connection with her/his body and/or sexual activity such as:
i. Viewing another person’s sexual activity, intimate body parts, or nakedness in a place where that person would have a reasonable expectation of privacy, without that person’s consent.
ii. Recording images (e.g. video, photograph) or audio of another person’s sexual activity, intimate body parts, or nakedness without that person’s consent;
iii. Disseminating images (e.g. video, photograph) or audio of another person’s sexual activity, intimate body parts, or nakedness, if the individual distributing the images or audio knows or should have known that the person depicted in the images or audio did not consent to such disclosure;
iv. Using or installing, or permitting the use or installation of a device for the purpose of recording another person’s sexual activity, intimate body parts or nakedness in a place where the person would have a reasonable expectation of privacy without that person’s consent.

z.  Writing. Whenever this policy requires in “writing,” electronic mail satisfies the writing requirement.

IV. Prohibited Conduct

A. Sexual Harassment, Gender-Based Harassment and Sexual Violence
This policy prohibits sexual harassment, gender-based harassment and sexual violence (together “Sexual Misconduct”) against any CUNY student, employee or visitor.
Sexual harassment includes unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature, such as unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal, nonverbal, graphic and electronic communications or physical conduct that is sufficiently serious to adversely affect an individual’s participation in employment, education or other CUNY activities.
Sexual harassment is considered a form of employee misconduct and an employee who engages in such conduct, or, managerial and supervisory personnel who knowingly allow such behavior to continue, shall be subject to discipline in accordance with applicable rules, policies and collective bar- gaining agreements.
Gender-based harassment is unwelcome conduct of a nonsexual nature based on an individual’s actual or perceived sex, including conduct based on gender identity, gender expression, and nonconformity with gender stereotypes that is sufficiently serious to adversely affect an individual’s participation in employment, education or other CUNY activities.


Sexual violence is an umbrella term that includes: (1) sexual activity without affirmative consent, sexual assault, rape/ attempted rape, and forcible touching/fondling; (2) dating, domestic and intimate partner violence; (3) stalking/cyber- stalking (“stalking”), and (4) voyeurism.
The complete definitions of these terms, as well as other key terms used in this policy, are in Section III above.

B. Retaliation
This policy prohibits retaliation against any person who reports Sexual Misconduct, assists someone making such a report, participates in any manner in an investigation or resolution of a Sexual Misconduct complaint, including testifying or assisting in a legal proceeding, or opposes in a reason-  able manner an act or policy believed to constitute Sexual Misconduct. Federal, state, and local laws also prohibit retaliation.

C. Certain Intimate Relationships
This policy also prohibits certain intimate relationships when they occur between a faculty member or employee and any student for whom he or she has a professional responsibility as set forth in Section XII below.

V.  Title IX Coordinator

Each college or unit of CUNY has an employee who has been designated as the Title IX Coordinator. This employee is responsible for compliance with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, which prohibits sex discrimination, including Sexual Misconduct, in education programs, and with New York State Law Article 129B, commonly referred to as the Enough is Enough, Combating Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence on College Campuses (hereafter “Enough is Enough”). The Title IX Coordinator has overall responsibility for implementing this policy, including overseeing the investigation of complaints at her/his college or unit and carrying out the other functions of that position set forth in this policy. All Title IX Coordinators shall receive annual training on Sexual Misconduct as required by Title IX, the Clery Act, Enough is Enough, and other civil rights law. The name and contact information for all Title IX Coordinators at CUNY can be found on the university’s dedicated Title IX website http://www1.cuny.edu/sites/title-ix/campus-websites/campus/university/  

VI.  Assistance in Cases of Sexual Violence

A. Reporting to Law Enforcement
Students, employees and other community members who experience any form of sexual violence on or off-campus (including CUNY-sponsored trips and events) and visitors who experience sexual violence on a CUNY campus may, but are not required to, report to local law enforcement, and/or state police. CUNY does not require a complainant to report sexual misconduct to law enforcement; however, if a student, employee, or other community member does wish to report to law enforcement, CUNY will provide assistance. Each college public safety office shall have an appropriately trained employee available at all times to provide the complainant with information regarding options to proceed, including information regarding the criminal justice process and the preservation of evidence. Campus public safety officers can also assist the complainant with filing a complaint both on and off-campus, and in obtaining immediate medical attention and other services.

Additional information is available on the university’s Title IX website http://www1.cuny.edu/sites/title-ix/campus-websites/campus/university/

B. Relationship of CUNY’s Investigation to the Action of Outside Law Enforcement
In cases where the complainant files a complaint with outside law enforcement authorities as well as with the college, the college shall determine what actions to take based on its own investigation. The college may coordinate with outside law enforcement authorities in order to avoid interfering with their activities and, where possible, to obtain information regarding their investigation. Neither a law enforcement determination whether to prosecute a respondent, nor the outcome of any criminal prosecution, is dispositive of whether the respondent has committed a violation of this policy.


Students, employees and other community members should be aware that CUNY procedures and standards differ from those of criminal procedures. When CUNY investigates allegations of sexual misconduct or brings disciplinary proceedings for violations of this policy, the issue is whether the respondent violated CUNY policy. The standard applied in making this determination is whether the preponderance of the evidence substantiates the complaint, or, stated another way, whether it is more likely than not that the alleged conduct occurred. An individual found to have violated this policy may be sanctioned by the college and CUNY. In the criminal justice system, on the other hand, the issue is whether the accused violated state criminal law. The standard applied is proof beyond a reasonable doubt and an individual found guilty of a crime is subject to criminal penalties, such as incarceration, probation and fines.

C. Obtaining Immediate Medical Attention and Emotional Support

CUNY encourages anyone who has experienced sexual assault or domestic, dating or intimate partner violence to seek medical attention as soon as possible. Medical resources can provide treatment for injuries, preventative treatment for sexually transmitted diseases, emergency contraception, and other health services. They can also assist in preserving evidence or documenting any injuries. Taking these steps promptly after an incident can be very helpful if an individual later decides to seek criminal proceedings or a protective order. Individuals who have experienced or witnessed sexual violence are also encouraged to seek emotional support, either on or off-campus.

D. On-Campus Resources

On campus resources include nurses and/or nurse practitioners at campus health offices and counselors at campus counseling centers. Counselors are trained to provide crisis intervention and provide referrals for longer-term care as necessary.

CUNY also maintains a list of off-campus emergency contacts and resources, including rape crisis centers, available throughout New York City on its dedicated web page.

(http://www1.cuny.edu/sites/title-ix/campus-websites/resources/) This includes a list of local hospitals designated as SAFE (Sexual Assault Forensic Examiner) hospitals, which are specially equipped to handle sexual assaults and trained to gather evidence from such assaults.

VII. Important Information About Confidentiality, Privacy and Required Referrals

CUNY values the privacy of its students, employees, and visitors. They should be able to seek the assistance they need without fear that the information they provide will be shared more broadly. Some individuals who serve as resources on campus are confidential resources and will not share any identifying information with others, except as required by law in emergency circumstances. Other individuals are not permitted to maintain confidentiality but will protect privacy to the greatest extent possible and share information with other staff only on a need-to- know basis.

Confidential Resources. Individuals considered confidential resources include counselors and health care providers at the college counseling centers and health offices, pastoral counselors, and designated staff members at women’s or men’s centers, if they exist on campus. Students may use these resources even if they decide not to make a report or participate in University disciplinary proceedings or the criminal justice process.
Private But Non-Confidential Resources. Many college employees are required by federal and state law to provide information about possible sexual misconduct to the Title IX Coordinator. Individuals designated as non-confidential but private resources will protect privacy to the greatest extent possible, but must share relevant information about sexual misconduct with the Title IX Coordinator.
More information about confidential and private but non-confidential resources is provided in Section IX, below.
Under the Clery Act, the College is required to maintain records, advise the government about reports of certain crimes, and issue timely warnings when there is a serious, continuing threat to the community. Such reports and warnings do not disclose the names of reporting individuals.

VIII. Reporting Sexual Misconduct to the College

In order for the University to address allegations of sexual misconduct, it has to learn about them. Accordingly, CUNY strongly encourages individuals who have experienced sexual misconduct to file a complaint with a designated campus official, as outlined below. The designated officials are trained to accept complaints, to ensure they are investigated in accordance with this policy, and to help complainants get necessary assistance.

Students, faculty, staff and visitors are encouraged to report incidents of sexual misconduct to campus officials, even if they have reported the incident to outside law enforcement authorities, and regardless of whether the incident took place on or off-campus (including “study abroad” programs.) Such reporting will enable complainants to get the support they need and provide the college with the information it needs to take appropriate action.

A. Complainant’s Rights

Individuals who have experienced sexual misconduct have the right to file a complaint with the college or to decide not to do so. (The decision on whether to bring disciplinary charges, however, rests with the campus.) Students who report sexual misconduct have all of the rights contained in the Students Bill of Rights (copy attached).

Complainants also have these rights:

  • To notify campus public safety, local law enforcement, and/or the state police; or to choose not to report.

  • To have emergency access to a college official trained to interview victims of sexual assault and able to provide certain information, including reporting options and information about confidentiality and privacy. The official will, where appropriate, advise the reporting individual about the importance of preserving evidence and obtaining a sexual assault forensic examination (“SAFE”) as soon as possible. The official will also explain that the criminal process uses different standards of proof, evidence, and that any questions about whether an incident violated criminal law should be addressed to a law enforcement official or a district attorney’s office.

  • To disclose the incident to a college representative who  can offer confidentiality or privacy and assist in obtaining services for reporting individuals. See Section IX, below.

  • To describe the incident only to those campus officials who need the information in order to properly respond and to repeat the description as few times as practicable.

  • To have complaints investigated in accordance with CUNY policy.

  • To have privacy preserved to the extent possible.

  • To receive assistance and resources on campus, including confidential and free on-campus counseling, and to be notified of other services available on- and off- campus, including the New York State Office of Victim Services.

  • To disclose the incident to the college’s Human Resources Director or designee (if the accused is a college employee) or request that a confidential or private resource assist in doing so.

  • To disclose the incident confidentially and obtain services from state and local governments.

  • To receive assistance from the campus or others in filing a criminal complaint, initiating legal proceedings in family court or civil court, and /or seeking an Order of Protection or the equivalent. In New York City, this assistance is provided by Family Justice Centers located in each borough,   www1.nyc.gov/site/ocdv/ programs/family-justice-centers.page.

  • To receive assistance with effecting an arrest when an individual violates an Order of Protection, which may be provided by assisting local law enforcement in effecting such an arrest.

  • To withdraw a complaint or involvement from the process at any time.

Students can speak with confidential resources on a strictly confidential basis before determining whether to make a report to college authorities. See Section IX, below. Students also have the right to consult confidentially with state, local and private resources who can provide other assistance.

B. Where to File a Complaint on Campus

Students, employees and visitors who experience sexual misconduct should bring their complaints to one of these campus officials/offices:

  • Title IX Coordinator;

  • Office of Public Safety;

  • Office of Vice President for Student Affairs or Dean of Students (students only)

  • Residence Life staff in CUNY owned or operated housing (students and residence visitors only)

  • Human Resources Director (employees only)

Contact information for these officials can be found on page 264 There is no prescribed method for filing a complaint of sexual misconduct and the college will respond to complaints whether they are oral or written. Complainants may, but are not required to, fill out the CUNY Sexual Misconduct Complaint form. After the form is filled out, it should be brought to one of the offices listed above.
Once any of the officials or offices above is notified of an incident of sexual misconduct, she/he will provide a copy of this Policy to the Complainant and coordinate with appropriate college offices to address the matter in accordance with this policy, including taking appropriate interim and supportive measures. These officials and offices will maintain a complainant’s privacy to the greatest extent possible, and all information in connection with the complaint, including the identities of the complainant and the respondent, will be shared only with those who have a legitimate need for the information.

Visitors: CUNY strongly encourages visitors to report all incidents of sexual misconduct that they observe or experience while on a CUNY campus or at a CUNY sponsored event to the Office of Public Safety, Residence Life staff, or other appropriate college officials listed above. In certain instances, CUNY may be able to offer those visitors who have experienced sexual misconduct with resources and assistance.

C. Request that the College Maintain a Complainant’s Confidentiality or Not Conduct an Investigation

After a report of an alleged incident of sexual misconduct is made to the Title IX Coordinator, a complainant may request (a) that the matter be investigated only to the extent possible without further revealing her/his identity or any details regarding the incident being divulged further (b) that no investigation into a particular incident be conducted, or (c) that an incident not be reported to outside law enforcement.
In all such cases, the Title IX Coordinator will weigh the complainant’s request against the college’s obligation to provide a safe, non-discriminatory environment for all students, employees and visitors, including the complainant. Factors used to determine whether to honor such a request include, but are not limited to: (a) whether the respondent has a history of violent behavior or is a repeat offender; (b) whether the incident represents escalation of unlawful conduct by the accused from previously noted behavior; (c) any increased risk that the accused will commit additional acts of violence, (d) whether the accused used a weapon or force; (e) whether the complainant is a minor; (f) whether the college possesses other means to obtain evidence such as security footage; and (g) whether available information reveals pattern of misconduct at a given location or by particular group.


A decision to maintain confidentiality does not mean that confidentiality can be absolutely guaranteed in all circumstances, but that reasonable efforts will be made to keep information confidential consistent with law. Notwithstanding the decision of the Title IX Coordinator regarding the scope of any investigation, the college will provide the complainant with ongoing assistance and support, including, where appropriate, the interim and supportive measures set forth in Section VII of this policy.


If the Title IX Coordinator determines that the college may maintain confidentiality as requested by the complainant, the college will, if possible, take reasonable steps to investigate the incident consistent with the request for confidentiality. However, a college’s ability to meaningfully investigate the incident and pursue disciplinary action may be limited by such a request for confidentiality.

D. Filing External Complaints

Complainants who feel that they have been subjected to unlawful sexual harassment and/or violence have the right to avail themselves of any and all of their rights under law, including but not limited to filing complaints with one or more of the outside agencies listed below.

E. Action by Bystanders and Other Community Members

While only employees designated as “responsible” employees are required reporters as set forth in Section IX below, CUNY encourages all other community members, including faculty, students and visitors, to take reasonable and prudent actions to prevent or stop an act of sexual misconduct that they may witness. Although these actions will depend on the circumstances, they may include direct intervention, calling law enforcement, or seeking assistance from a person in authority.


In addition, CUNY encourages all community members to report any incident of sexual misconduct that they observe or become aware of to the Title IX Coordinator, or the offices of Public Safety, Vice President of Students Affairs (students), Dean of Students (students) or Human Resources (employees) at their college. Community members who take action in accordance with this paragraph will be supported by the college, and anyone who retaliates against them will be subject to disciplinary charges.

F. Amnesty for Drug and Alcohol Use

The health and safety of every student at CUNY is of the utmost importance. CUNY recognizes that students who have been drinking and/or using drugs (whether such use is voluntary or involuntary) at a time that violence ( including but not limited to sexual violence) occurs may be hesitant to report such incidents due to fear of potential consequences for their own conduct. CUNY strongly encourages students to report sexual violence to college officials. A bystander or complainant acting in good faith who discloses any incident of sexual violence to college officials or law enforcement will not be subject to discipline under “The City University of New York Policy on Drugs and Alcohol,” page 271 for violations of alcohol and/or drug use policies occurring at or near the time of the commission of the sexual violence.


This policy does not provide amnesty for drug dealers or those who use drugs or alcohol as a weapon or to facilitate assault. Under CUNY’s Amnesty for Drug and Alcohol Policy, personal drug use and possession, whether it is intentional or accidental, will not form the basis of faculty student disciplinary charges.

G. Reporting Suspected Child Abuse

Certain members of the CUNY community who interact with, supervise, chaperone, or otherwise oversee minors in programs or activities at CUNY or sponsored by CUNY are required to report immediately to the New York State Maltreatment Hotline if they have reasonable cause to suspect abuse or maltreatment of individuals under the age of 18. Information regarding mandated child abuse reporting is available on the Office of the General Counsel web page.

(http://www.cuny.edu/about/administration/offices/la/advisories/reporting-suspected-child-abuse.pdf)

If anyone other than New York State mandated reporters has reasonable cause to believe that a minor is being or has been abused or maltreated on campus, she/he should notify either the Title IX Coordinator or Director of Public Safety. If any CUNY community member witnesses child abuse while it is happening, she/he should immediately call 911.

H. Reporting Retaliation

An individual may file a complaint with the Title IX Coordinator if the individual has been retaliated against for reporting sexual misconduct, opposing in a reasonable manner an act or policy believed to constitute sexual misconduct, assisting someone making such a report, or participating in any manner in an investigation or resolution of a sexual misconduct complaint. All retaliation complaints will be investigated in accordance with the investigation procedures set forth in Section XI of this policy, and individuals who are found to have engaged in retaliation will be subject to disciplinary action.

IX. Reporting/Confidentiality Obligations of College and University Employees

An individual who speaks to a college or CUNY employee about sexual misconduct should be aware that employees fall into three categories:

  • “Confidential” employees, who have an obligation to maintain a complainant’s confidentiality regarding the incident(s);

  • “Responsible” employees, who are required to report the incident(s) to the Title IX Coordinator

  • All other employees, who are strongly encouraged but not required to report the incident(s).

A.  Confidential Employees

i.   For Students. Students at CUNY who wish to speak to some- one who will keep all of the communications confidential should speak to one of the following:

  • Counselor or other staff member at their college counseling center;

  • Nurse, nurse practitioner or other college health office staff member;

  • Pastoral counselor, if available at the college; or

  • Designated staff member in a women’s or men’s center, if one exists at their college.

These individuals will not report information about an incident to the college’s Title IX Coordinator or other college employees without the student’s permission. The only exception is in the case where there is an imminent threat of serious harm to the complainant or any other person

If a student speaks solely to a “confidential” employee, the college will rarely be able to conduct an investigation into  the particular incident or pursue disciplinary action against the alleged perpetrator. Confidential employees will assist students in obtaining other necessary support. A student who first requests confidentiality may later decide to file a com- plaint with the college or with local law enforcement.

ii.  For Employees. Although CUNY does not directly employ individuals to whom CUNY employees can speak on a confidential basis regarding sexual misconduct, free confidential support services are available through CUNY’s Work/Life Program  (  http://www2.cuny.edu/about/administration/offices/hr/benefits/ ), which is administered by an outside company. Confidential community counseling resources are also available throughout New York City ( http://www. nownyc.org/service-fund/get-help/rape-sexual-assault/medical-help-counseling-for-sexual-assault/).

B. “Responsible” Employees–Private, But Not Confidential.

“Responsible” employees have a duty to report incidents of sexual misconduct, including all relevant details, to the Title IX Coordinator. Such employees are not permitted to maintain a complainant’s confidentiality, except that the Title IX Coordinator may honor a request for confidentiality under the circumstances described in Section VII above. However, these employees will maintain a complainant’s privacy to the great- est extent possible, and information reported to them will be shared only with the Title IX Coordinator and other people responsible for handling the college’s response to the report.

To the extent possible, before a complainant reveals any information to a responsible employee, the employee shall advise the complainant of the employee’s reporting obligations—and if the complainant wants to maintain confidentiality, direct the complainant to confidential resources identified above.

CUNY has designated the following individuals as “responsible” employees. Complainants who wish to report sexual violence are encouraged to speak with one of the responsible employees marked *

i. *Title IX Coordinator and her/his staff

ii. * Office of Public Safety employees (all)

iii. * Vice President for Student Affairs or Dean of Students and all staff housed in those offices

iv. * Residence Life staff in CUNY owned or operated housing, including Resident Assistants (all) (for students and housing visitors)

v. * Human Resources staff (all) (for employees)

vi. College President, Vice Presidents and Deans

vii. Athletics Staff (all)

viii. Faculty Athletics Representatives

ix. Department Chairpersons/Executive Officers

x. University Office of the General Counsel employees (all)

xi. College/unit attorney and her/his staff

xiii. College/unit labor designee and her/his staff

xiv. International Education Liaisons/Study Abroad Campus Directors and Field Directors

xv. Faculty and staff members at times when they are leading or supervising student on off-campus trips

xvi. Faculty or staff advisors to student groups

xvii. Employees who are Managers or Supervisors (all)

xviii. SEEK/College Discovery staff (all)

xiv. College Childcare Center staff (all)

xv. Directors of “Educational Opportunity Centers” affiliated with CUNY colleges

xvi. Faculty or staff academic advisors

C. All Other Employees

Employees other than those identified in subsections “A” and “B” above are strongly encouraged but not required to report any possible sexual misconduct to the Title IX Coordinator. They are also strongly encouraged to maintain individual privacy to the greatest extent possible by sharing information, including the identities of the complainant and the respondent, only with the Title IX coordinator.

It is important to emphasize that faculty members other than those specifically identified in sub- Section “B” above have not been designated as “responsible” employees and do not have an obligation to report the matter to the Title IX Coordinator, although they are strongly encouraged to do so. An individual who wishes to ensure that the Title IX

Coordinator is notified of an incident is strongly encouraged to speak with the Title IX Coordinator or one of the other individuals identified in Section IX, above.

D. Special Rules Concerning Public Awareness and Advocacy Events

CUNY supports public awareness events that help provide  its community with information about sexual misconduct  and how it can be addressed and prevented. In order to preserve the ability to participate freely in public awareness and advocacy events, if an individual discloses information about sexual misconduct at such event (for example, Take Back the Night gatherings, candlelight vigils, or protests) the college will not treat the disclosure as triggering an obligation to commence an investigation based on that information. Such individuals are encouraged to report sexual misconduct to college officials so that the college can provide resources and assistance.

X. No Contact Orders and Other Interim and Supportive Measures

When a college becomes aware of an allegation of sexual misconduct and the complainant or other affected parties request interim or supportive measures, the college will take appropriate interim and supportive measures to protect the complainant and other affected parties, to assist the parties, and to protect against retaliation. Appropriate interim and supportive measures may also be available to respondents. The college may also take interim measures to protect the college community at large.

The college’s Title IX Coordinator is responsible for coordinating interim and supportive measures, which are available even if the complainant chooses not to file or continue to pursue a complaint. Requests for interim and supportive measures should be made to the Title IX Coordinator.

The Title IX Coordinator will work with the Chief Student Affairs Officer to identify a trained staff member to assist students to obtain interim and supporting measures. The Title IX Coordinator will work with the Human Resources Director to assist employee complainants to obtain interim and supporting measures.

A.        No Contact Orders

When respondent is a student, the complainant has the right to a college-issued “no contact order” under which continued intentional contact with the complainant would violate this policy. No contact orders may be issued for both the complainant and the respondent, as well as other individuals as appropriate.

B.        Types of Interim and Supportive Measures

Possible interim and supportive measures include:

i.       Making appropriate changes to academic programs, including changes in class schedule, accommodations to permit the complainant to take an incomplete or drop a course or courses without penalty, permitting complainant or respondent to attend a class via skype or other alternative means, providing an academic tutor, or extending deadlines for assignments;

ii.      Making appropriate changes to residential housing situations or providing assistance in finding alternate housing;

iii.     Changing an employee’s work assignment or schedule;

iv.     Providing the complainant with an escort to and from class or campus work location;

v.      Arranging appropriate transportation services to ensure safety;

vi.     Offering counseling services through the college Counseling Center or other appropriate office, or referral to an off-campus agency;

vii.    Assisting the complainant in obtaining medical and other services, including access to rape crisis centers;

viii.   Assisting the complainant with filing a criminal com- plaint and/or seeking an order of protection;

ix.      Enforcing an order of protection;

x.     Obtaining a copy and/or explaining the terms of an order of protection and the consequences of violating it;

xi.     Addressing situations in which it appears that a complainant’s academic progress is affected by the alleged incident;

xii.      In exceptional circumstances, where a respondent is determined to present a continuing threat to the health and safety of the community, the college may seek an emergency interim suspension of a student or take similar emergency measures against an employee, consistent with applicable CUNY Bylaws, rules, policies and collective bargaining agreements. The Office of Public Safety will, in cooperation with the Title IX Coordinator and appropriate other campus officials, determine whether a respondent presents a continuing threat to the health and safety of the campus, including (a) whether the respondent has a history of violent behavior or is a repeat offender; (b) whether the incident represents escalation in unlawful conduct by the accused; and (c) any increased risk that the accused will commit additional acts of violence.

C.        Interim Emergency Student Suspensions

The president or her/his designee may in emergency or extraordinary circumstances, temporarily suspend a student pending an early hearing for not more than twelve (12) calendar days, unless the student requests an adjournment. See Section B above.

Prior to the commencement of a temporary suspension of a student, the college shall give the student respondent oral notice (which shall be confirmed via email to the address appearing on the records of the college) or written notice of the charges. If the respondent denies them, the college shall forthwith give the respondent an informal oral explanation of the evidence supporting the charges and the student may present informally her/his explanation or theory of the matter.

Both complainant and the respondent will be notified of the suspension and if or when it the suspension is lifted at the same time and in the same manner.

D.        Process for Review of Interim Measures, including “No Contact” Orders and Interim Suspensions.

Upon request, the complainant and the respondent shall  each be afforded a prompt review of the need for and terms of restrictive interim measures, including “no contact” orders and interim suspensions. Issues that may be raised include possible modification or discontinuance of a “no contact” order. Complainants and respondents shall be allowed to

submit evidence to support their request. The request shall be made to the college’s Chief Student Affairs Officer, if either the complainant or the respondent is a student, or to the college’s Human Resources Director, if neither the complainant nor the respondent are students. If a request is made in a case involving both a student and an employee, the Chief Student

Affairs Officer shall consult with the Human Resources Director. The Chief Student Affairs Officer or Human Resources Director may consult with the Title IX Coordinator and other relevant officials regarding the request. If appropriate and possible, the college may establish an appropriate schedule for the complainant and the respondent to access college facilities when they are not being used by the other party to enable both parties to use college facilities to the maximum extent feasible, without violation of the “no contact” order.

Requests for accommodations that were made under CUNY’s Procedures for Implementing Reasonable Accommodations and Academic Adjustments and do not directly affect the other party are governed by the appeals provisions set forth in those Procedures.

XI. Investigating Complaints of Sexual Misconduct

The college will conduct an investigation when it becomes aware, from any source (including third-parties not connected to the college or university), that sexual misconduct may have been committed against a student, employee or visitor, unless the information provided is insufficient to permit an investigation or the complainant has requested that the college refrain from such an investigation and the college has determined that refraining from an investigation will not result in a continuing threat to the college community. See Section VIII, above.

A.        Rights of the Complainant and Respondent.

Whenever an investigation takes place, the complainant and respondent shall have these rights:

•        To an investigation and process that is fair, impartial, timely and thorough and provides a meaningful opportunity to be heard;

•        To have the complaint investigated and/or adjudicated by individuals who receive annual training in conducting investigations of sexual violence, the effects of trauma, impartiality, and the rights of the respondent, including the right to a presumption that the respondent is “not responsible” until any finding of responsibility;

•        To have the college’s judicial or conduct process run concurrently with any criminal justice investigation and proceeding, except for temporary delays requested by external municipal entities while law enforcement gathers evidence;

•        To receive reasonable advance written or electronic notice of any meeting they are required to or eligible to attend, of the specific rule or law alleged to have been violated and in what manner;

•        To exclude their own prior sexual history with persons other than the other party in the conduct process or their own mental health diagnosis and/or treatment from admittance in the stage that determines responsibility. (Past findings of sexual misconduct may be admissible in the stage that determines sanction.)

•        To offer evidence during the investigation;

•        To review documents and tangible evidence, consistent with FERPA and other law;

•        To be accompanied by an attorney or other advisor of their choice, who may assist and advise the complain- ant or respondent throughout the process including during all related meetings and hearings. Such attorneys or advisors must comply with the CUNY policies and procedures; and

•        To simultaneous notice of the outcome of proceedings.

B.        The Investigation

The college Title IX Coordinator is responsible for conducting any investigation in a prompt, thorough, and impartial manner and may designate another appropriately trained administrator to conduct all or part of the investigation. Whenever an investigation is conducted, the Title IX Coordinator shall

•        Coordinate investigative efforts with other appropriate offices;

•        Inform the complainant that an investigation is being commenced and that the respondent will receive a written summary of the allegations;

•        Inform the respondent that an investigation is being commenced and provide the respondent with a written summary of the allegations of the complaint. A respondent employee who is covered by a collective bargaining agreement may consult with and have a union representative present at any interview of that employee conducted as part of such investigation;

•        Interview witnesses who might reasonably be expected to provide information relevant to the allegations, and review relevant documents and evidence. Both the complainant and respondent shall be informed that they have the right to provide relevant documents and to propose for interview witnesses whom they reasonably believe can provide relevant information.

Neither the complainant nor the respondent is restricted from discussing and sharing information related to the complaint with others who may support or assist them. This does not, however, permit unreasonable sharing of private information in a manner intended to harm or embarrass another, or in a manner that would recklessly do so regardless of intention. Such unreasonable sharing may constitute retaliation under this Policy.

The college Title IX Coordinator shall maintain all documents of the investigation in accordance with the CUNY Records Retention and Disposition Policy. http://policy.cuny.edu/schedule/

The college shall make reasonable efforts to ensure that the investigation and resolution of a complaint are carried out as timely and efficiently as possible. However, the college may need to temporarily delay the fact-finding portion of its investigation during the evidence-gathering phase of a law enforcement investigation. Temporary delays will generally not last more than ten days except when law enforcement specifically requests and justifies a longer delay. While some complaints may require more extensive investigation, when possible, the investigation of complaints should be completed within sixty

(60)     Calendar days of the receipt of the complaint. If there is a delay in completing the investigation, the Title IX Coordinator shall notify the complainant and the respondent in writing.

i.       Role of the Advisor

In cases involving this Policy, both the complainant and respondent may be accompanied by an advisor of their choice (including an attorney) who may advise throughout the entire process, including all meetings and hearings. While advisors may represent a party and fully participate at a hearing, they may not speak during the meetings that proceed the hearing nor give testimony as a witness at the hearing.

C.        Conflicts

If a complainant or respondent believes that any individual involved in the investigatory or adjudication process has a conflict of interest, he or she may make a request to the Chief Student Affairs Officer (or, if no students are involved, to the Legal or Labor Designee) to have that conflicted individual removed from the process. The request for removal must be in writing within five days of the complaint or respondent’s notification that the individual is to be involved and include a detailed description of the conflict. If the Chief Student Affairs Officer (or Legal or Labor Designee) determines that a conflict does exist, he or she will take immediate steps to address the conflict in order to ensure an impartial and fair process.

If any administrator designated by this policy to participate in the investigation or resolution of a complaint (including but not limited to the Title IX Coordinator) is the respondent, the College President will appoint another college administrator to perform such person’s duties under this policy. If the President is the respondent, the investigation will be handled by the University Title IX Coordinator or her/his designee.

D.        Informal Resolution

Except in instances involving sexual assault, the Title IX Coordinator, in their discretion, may offer the respondent and the complainant the opportunity to participate in the informal resolution process. Informal resolution may take place after the Title IX Coordinator has completed the investigation, but before the Title IX report has been completed, in an effort to resolve the matter by mutual agreement. The informal resolution process shall be conducted by the Title IX Coordinator,  or by a qualified staff or faculty member designated by Title IX Coordinator, in coordination with the Chief Student  Affairs Officer.

Both the complainant and the respondent have the right to end the informal resolution process at any time. Any informal resolution must be acceptable to the complainant, the respondent, and the Title IX Coordinator. Even if both the respondent and complainant agree to a resolution, the Title IX Coordinator must also agree with the resolution for it to be final.

If a resolution is reached, the complainant and the respondent shall be notified in writing, and the Title IX Coordinator will confer with the Chief Student Affairs Officer when creating a written memorandum memorializing the agreed upon resolution and consequences for non-compliance. This memorandum will be included in the respondent’s student record.

If no agreement is reached within a reasonable time, the Title IX Coordinator shall complete the Title IX report and take action in accordance with subsection E below. Information learned during and directly from the informal resolution process will not be documented in the Title IX report.

E.        Action Following the Investigation or Closure of a Complaint.

i.       Within 30 days following the completion of an investigation, the Title IX Coordinator shall report her/his findings to the College President in writing (“Report of Findings”). In the event the complainant or the respondent is a student, the report shall also be sent to the Chief Student Affairs Officer. A copy of the report shall be maintained in the files of the Title IX Coordinator.

ii.      In making findings regarding the allegations, the Title IX Coordinator shall use the “preponderance of the evidence” standard.

iii.     Following receipt of the Report of Findings, the College President shall, when warranted by the facts, authorize such action as she/he deems necessary to address

the issues raised in the Report of Findings, including action to correct the effects of the conduct investigated or prevent further harm to an affected party or others similarly situated. This may include a recommendation that disciplinary action be commenced against a respondent, as set forth in Section XII below.

iv.     Within 30 calendar days following the termination of an investigation that has not been completed (for example, because it was resolved by mediation or the complainant withdrew cooperation) the Title IX Coordinator will summarize for the file the actions taken in response to the complaint and the basis on which the investigation was closed.

F.        Malicious Allegations

Members of the CUNY community who make false and malicious complaints of violations of this policy of as opposed to complaints which, even if erroneous, are made in good faith, may be subject to disciplinary action.

XII. Disciplinary Process and Procedures

A.        Disciplinary Action

If the College President recommends that disciplinary action be commenced against a respondent student or employee for violations of this Policy, the following procedures shall apply:

Discipline Against Students:

a.       In cases where a College President recommends discipline against a student for violations of this Policy, the matter shall be referred to the college’s Office of Student Affairs and action shall be taken in accordance with Section 11.A-C of this Policy, below. This Section provides for, among other things, a University-Wide Faculty-Student Disciplinary Committee consisting

of faculty members, students and in some cases staff members to hear and decide charges of violation of this Policy.

b.      As described in Sections XI above, complainants have the same rights as respondents:

•        To receive notice of the charges, including the date, time, location and factual allegations, concerning alleged violation of this Policy;

•        To receive notice of the specific provisions alleged to have been violated and possible sanctions;

•        To present evidence and testimony at any hearing, where appropriate;

•        To be represented by an attorney or advisor of their choice;

•        To receive access to a full and fair record of any hearing;

•        To receive written notice of the decision of the faculty-student disciplinary committee, specifically whether the allegations were substantiated and what, if any, penalty was imposed;

•        To make an impact statement at the point when the decision maker is deliberating on appropriate sanctions;

•        To written notice of findings of fact, decisions and sanctions if any, as well as the rationale for the decision and any sanction;

•        To choose whether to or discuss the outcome of a conduct or judicial process;

•        To appeal to a decision maker that is fair and impartial and does not include individuals with conflicts of interest;

•        To have all information obtained during the conduct process protected from public release until a decision maker on appeal makes a final determination, unless otherwise required by law.

c.       Penalties for students instituted after a hearing before the faculty-student disciplinary committee range from a warning to suspension or expulsion from the University. Students accused of crimes of violence are also subject to the university’s policy on transcript notations which is discussed in this Section below.

Discipline Against Employees

In cases where the college President recommends discipline against an employee, the matter shall be referred for disciplinary action in accordance with the applicable CUNY policies, rules and collective bargaining agreements. Penalties for employees include, depending on the employee’s title, reprimand, suspension, demotion, fine, or termination of employment following applicable disciplinary procedures. For many respondent employees, these procedures may include a hearing before a non-CUNY fact-finder, as required by the particular collective bargaining agreement.

For additional information on the disciplinary process in specific cases, complainants should consult their campus Title IX Coordinator, who will work with campus Human Resources Director to provide information. Respondents should consult their union representative, if any, or campus Human Resources Director.

Action Against Visitors

In cases where the person accused of sexual misconduct  is not a CUNY student or employee, the college’s ability to take action against the accused is usually extremely limited. However, the college shall take all appropriate actions within its control, such as restricting the visitor’s access to campus. In addition, subject to Section VI, above, the matter may be referred to local law enforcement for legal action, including seeking Orders of Protection and/or reporting to local law enforcement, where appropriate. College Public Safety will assist both students and employees in enforcing Orders of Protection on the campus.

No Disciplinary Action

In cases where a determination is made not to bring disciplinary action, the Title IX Coordinator shall inform the complainant and respondent of that decision at the same time, in writing, and shall offer any appropriate support services, including counseling to both.

A.        Student Disciplinary Procedures

Referral of Violation for Disciplinary Action

If the President decides that discipline is warranted, the President will refer the matter to the Chief Student Affairs Officer for further action. The chief student affairs officer may rely on the investigation and determination of the Title IX Coordinator and prefer disciplinary charges.

In instances where a respondent is alleged to have violated this Policy as well as other CUNY policies, rules or bylaws, the entire matter will be heard before the University-Wide Faculty Student Disciplinary Committee and will follow the rules and procedures outlined in Section XI of this Policy.

Respondent Withdrawal Before Completion of the Process

In the event that a respondent withdraws from the college before a decision is rendered on the charges, the respondent is required to participate in the disciplinary hearing or otherwise to resolve the pending charges and shall be barred from attending any other unit of the university until a decision on the charges is made, or the charges are otherwise resolved.

Immediately following such withdrawal, the college shall place a notation on the respondent’s transcript that the respondent “withdrew with conduct charges pending.” If the respondent fails to appear, the college may proceed with  the disciplinary hearing in absentia, and any decision and sanction shall be binding, and the transcript notation, if any, resulting from that decision and penalty shall replace the notation.

Issuance of Charges & Notice of Hearing

Notice of the charge(s) and of the time and place of the hearing shall be sent to the respondent by both first-class mail  and email to the address appearing on the records of the college. Notice shall also be sent in a similar manner to the complainant to the extent that charges relate to the complainant. The Chief Student Affairs Officer is also encouraged to send the notice of charges to any other e-mail address that he or she may have for the respondent and the complainant.

The hearing shall be scheduled within a reasonable time following the filing of the charges or the mediation conference. Notice of at least seven (7) calendar days shall be given to the respondent in advance of the hearing unless the respondent consents to an earlier hearing. The respondent is permitted one (1) adjournment, for a reasonable amount of time under the circumstances, without specifying a reason. Additional requests for an adjournment must be made at least five (5) calendar days prior to the hearing date, and shall be granted or denied at the discretion of the chairperson of the Faculty Student Disciplinary Committee. If the respondent fails to respond to the notice, appear on the adjourned date, or request an extension, the college may proceed without the respondent present, and any decision and sanction shall be binding.

Content of Notice of Charges and Hearing The notice shall contain the following:

A.      A complete and itemized statement of the charge(s) being brought against the respondent including the policy, rule and/or bylaw the respondent is charged with violating, and the possible penalties for such violation.

B.      A statement that the respondent and the complainant have the right to attend and participate fully in the hearing including the right:

i.       To present their side of the story;

ii.      To present witnesses and evidence on their behalf;

iii.     To cross-examine witnesses presenting evidence, the exception being that the complainant and respondent may not cross-examine each other as discussed below;

iv.     For the respondent to remain silent without assumption of guilt; and

i.       To be represented by an advisor or legal counsel at  their expense; if the respondent or the complainant requests it, the college shall assist in finding a legal counsel or advisor.

ii.      A warning that anything the respondent says may be used against the respondent at a non-college hearing.

Review of Evidence before Hearing:

At least five (5) calendar days prior to the commencement of a student disciplinary hearing, the college shall provide the respondent and the complainant and/or their designated representative, with similar and timely access to review documents or other tangible evidence that the college intends to use at the disciplinary hearing, consistent with the restrictions imposed by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (“FERPA”). Should the college seek to introduce additional documents or other tangible evidence during the disciplinary hearing, the respondent and the complainant shall be afforded the opportunity to review the additional documents or tangible evidence. If during the hearing the complainant or the respondent submits documentary evidence, the chairperson may, at the request of any other party grant , adjournment of the hearing as necessary in the interest of fairness, to permit the requesting party time to review the newly produced evidence.

Admission & Acceptance of Penalty

After the charges have been preferred by the chief student affairs officer, but prior to the commencement of a disciplinary hearing, the respondent may admit to the charges and accept the penalty that the chief student affairs officer or designee determines to be appropriate to address the misconduct. If required by this Policy, the agreed-upon penalty shall be placed on the respondent’s transcript consistent with CUNY’s policy on Transcript Notations (see below). Before resolving a complaint in this manner, the chief student affairs officer or designee shall first consult with the complainant and provide the complainant with an opportunity to object to the proposed resolution, orally and/or in writing. If a resolution is reached over the complainant’s objection, the chief student affairs officer or designee shall provide the complainant with a statement of the reasons supporting such resolution, and the complainant may appeal the resolution to the college President.

C.        Faculty Student Disciplinary Committee Structure:

Each faculty-student disciplinary committee shall consist of two (2) faculty members or one (1)  faculty member and one (1)   member of the Higher Education Officer series (HEO), and two (2) student members and a chairperson, who shall be a faculty member. A quorum shall consist of the chairperson and any two (2) members, one of whom must be a student. Hearings shall be scheduled promptly (including during the summers) at a convenient time and efforts shall be made to insure full student and faculty representation.

The president shall select in consultation with the head of the appropriate campus governance body or where the president is the head of the governance body, its executive committee, three (3) members of the faculty of that college to receive training training upon appointment and to serve in rotation as chairperson of the disciplinary committee. The following schools shall be required to select two (2) chairpersons:, CUNY School of Law, Guttman Community College, CUNY School of Professional Studies, and the CUNY School of Journalism. If none of the chairpersons appointed from the campus can serve, the president, at her/his discretion, may request that a chairperson be selected by lottery from the entire group of chairpersons appointed by other colleges. The chairperson shall preside at all meetings of the faculty-student disciplinary committee and decide and make all rulings for the committee. She/he shall not be a voting member of the committee but shall vote in the event of a tie.

The faculty members shall be selected by lot from a panel of six (6) elected biennially by the appropriate faculty body from among the persons having faculty rank or faculty status.

Members of the panel shall be trained on an annual basis in compliance with the law and this Policy. CUNY School of Law, Guttman Community College, CUNY School of Professional Studies, and the CUNY School of Journalism shall be required to select four (4) faculty members. The HEO members shall be selected by lot from a panel of six (6) HEO appointed biennially by the president. CUNY School of Law, Guttman Community College, CUNY School of Professional Studies, and the CUNY School of Journalism shall be required to select four (4) HEO’s. The student members shall be selected by lot from a panel of six (6) elected annually in an election in which all students registered at the college shall be eligible to vote. CUNY School of Law, Guttman Community College, CUNY School of Professional Studies, and the CUNY School of Journalism shall be required to select four (4) students. In the event that the student or faculty panel or both are not elected, or if more panel members are needed, the president shall have the duty to select the panel or panels which have not been elected.

In the event that the chairperson cannot continue, the president shall appoint another chairperson. In the event that a seat becomes vacant and it is necessary to fill the seat to continue the hearing, the seat shall be filled from the respective faculty, HEO, or student panel by lottery

Each academic year, the chief student affairs officer, and her or his designee, shall appoint/identify one or more college employees to serve as presenters for the hearings. This list shall be forwarded to the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, and the Office of the General Counsel and Sr. Vice Chancellor for Legal Affairs prior to the first day of the academic year

Persons who are to be participants in the hearings as witnesses or have been involved in preferring the charges or who may participate in the appeals procedures or any other person having a direct interest in the outcome of the hearing shall be disqualified from serving on the committee

Roles and Responsibilities of Individuals during the Hearing

a.       Role and Responsibilities of Panel Chairperson:

The chairperson shall preside at the hearing. The parties to the hearing are the college, the respondent, and if the complainant chooses to participate, the complainant. At the commencement of the hearing, the chairperson shall inform the respondent of the charges, the hearing procedures, and her or his rights. After informing the respondent of the charges, the hearing procedures, and respondent’s rights, the chairperson shall  ask the respondent to state whether he or she is responsible or not responsible for the conduct. Prior to accepting testimony at the hearing, the chairperson shall rule on any motions questioning the impartiality of any committee member or the adequacy of the notice of the charge(s). Subsequent thereto, the chairperson shall rule on any motions regarding the admissibility of evidence and may exclude irrelevant, unreliable or unduly repetitive evidence. The chairperson shall exclude from the hearing room all persons who are to appear as witnesses, except the respondent and the complainant.

The chairperson shall preside at all hearing sessions and meetings and make all rulings for the panel. The chairperson has discretion to limit the number of witnesses and the length of testimony for the presentations by any party and/or their representative. All hearings pursuant to this Policy shall be closed hearings. The chairperson shall not be a voting member of the panel but shall vote in the event of a tie. In the event that the chairperson cannot continue, the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, or his or his designee, shall appoint another chairperson from the University- wide committee. In the event that a seat on the panel becomes vacant and it is necessary to fill the seat to continue the hearing, the seat shall be filled from the respective faculty, HEO, or student committee members by lot.

b.      Presenters:

Each academic year, the chief student affairs officer at each College or designee shall identify one or more college employees to serve as presenters for the hearings. This list will be forwarded to the Offices of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs and General Counsel and Vice Chancellor for Legal Affairs prior to the first day of the academic year. The employee who serves as presenter during the hearing shall be from the same institution as the respondent.

c.       Recording of Proceeding

The college shall make a recording of each fact-finding hearing by some means such as a stenographic transcript, an audio recording or the equivalent. No other recording of the proceedings shall be permitted. A respondent who has been found to have committed  the conduct charged after a hearing is entitled upon request to a copy of such a record without cost upon the condition that it is not to be disseminated except  to the respondent’s advisor. In the event of an appeal, both the respondent and the complainant are entitled upon request to a copy of such a record without cost, upon the condition that it is not to be disseminated except to their advisors.

Basic Hearing Rules:

If, at the commencement of the hearing, the respondent admits the conduct charged, the respondent shall be given  an opportunity to explain her/his actions before the hearing panel and the college shall be given an opportunity to respond and present evidence regarding the appropriate penalty. If the respondent denies the conduct charged, the college shall present its evidence. At the conclusion of the college’s presentation, the respondent may move to dismiss the charges. If the motion is denied by the committee, the complainant, if the complainant chooses to participate, shall be given an opportunity to make a presentation. After the college’s, and, if complainant chooses to participate, complain- ant’s presentation, the Respondent shall be given an opportunity to make a presentation.

The college bears the burden of proving the charge(s) by a preponderance of the evidence. The role of the hearing panel is to listen to the testimony, ask questions of the witnesses, review the testimony and evidence presented at the hearing and the papers filed by the parties and make a decision as to responsibility. In the event the respondent is found responsible for the conduct, the committee shall then determine the penalty to be imposed.

The college, the respondent and the complainant are permit- ted to have advisors act on their behalf during the pendency of a hearing, which shall include the calling and examining of witnesses, and presenting evidence. Any party intending to appear with an attorney shall give the other party five (5) calendar days’ notice of such representation.

Neither the respondent nor the complainant shall be permit- ted to cross-examine the other directly. Rather, if they choose to, the respondent and the complainant shall cross-examine each other only through an advisor. If either or both of them do not have an advisor, the college shall assist them to find  an advisor to conduct such cross-examination. In the alternative, the complainant and respondent may provide written questions to the chairperson to be posed to the witness, in the chairperson’s discretion.

Responsibility Phase

The following rules apply to the introduction of evidence at the hearing: Evidence of the mental health diagnosis and/or treatment of a complainant, respondent, or witness may not be introduced; and b) Evidence of either party’s prior sexual history may not be introduced except that (i) evidence of prior sexual history between complainant and respondent is admissible at any stage of the hearing, and (ii) past findings of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, or sexual assault may be admissible in the stage of that hearing related to penalty.

Penalty Phase

If the panel has found the Respondent responsible for the conduct, then the complainant, respondent, and college, will have the opportunity to introduce evidence and make arguments related what the appropriate penalty should be. The complainant, respondent and college will also have  the opportunity to introduce evidence of and comment on the respondent’s character, including any past findings of a respondent’s responsibility for domestic violence, stalking, or sexual assault or any other sexual misconduct, and submit a statement regarding the impact of the conduct.

The College may also introduce a copy of the respondent’s previous disciplinary records, if any, from any CUNY institution the respondent has attended, provided the respondent was shown a copy of the records prior to the commencement of the hearing. The previous disciplinary record shall be submitted to the panel in a sealed envelope, bearing the respondent’s signature across the seal, and shall only be opened if the respondent has been found responsible for the conduct charged. The hearing panel, to determine an appropriate penalty, shall use the disciplinary records, as well as any documents or character evidence introduced by the respondent, the complainant, or the college.

If either the complainant or the respondent chose not to participate in the hearing, they still have the opportunity to introduce evidence and make arguments related what the appropriate penalty should be and to provide or make an impact statement.

ii.      Decision

The panel shall issue a written decision, which shall be based solely on the testimony and evidence presented at the hearing, including the penalty phase. The college shall send to the respondent a copy of the panel’s decision within seven (7) calendar days of the conclusion of the hearing, by regular mail and e-mail to the address appearing on the records of the college. In cases involving two or more complainants or respondents, the college has fourteen (14) calendar days of the conclusion of the hearing to send the panel’s decision. The college is also encouraged to send the decision to any other e-mail address that it may have for the respondent. The decision shall be final subject to any appeal.

In cases involving a crime of violence or a non-forcible sex offense, the complainant shall simultaneously receive notice of the outcome of the faculty-student disciplinary committee’s decision as it relates to the offense(s) committed against the complainant, in the same manner as notice is given to the respondent.

When a disciplinary hearing results in a penalty of dismissal or suspension for one term or more, the decision is a university-wide penalty and the respondent shall be barred from admission to, or attendance at, any other unit of the university while the penalty is being served.

iii.     Appeals/Review

A respondent or a complainant may appeal a decision of the faculty-student disciplinary committee to the president on the following grounds: (i) procedural error, (ii) newly discovered evidence that was not reasonably available at the time of the hearing, or (iii) the disproportionate nature of the penalty. The president may remand for a new hearing or may modify  the penalty either by decreasing it (on an appeal by the respondent) or increasing it (on an appeal by the complainant). If the president is a party to the dispute, her/his functions with respect to an appeal shall be dis- charged by an official of the university to be appointed by the chancellor or her or his designee.

If the penalty after appeal to the president is one of dismissal or suspension for one term or more, a respondent or a complainant may appeal to the board commit- tee on student affairs and special programs. The board may dispose of the appeal in the same manner as the president

An appeal under this section shall be made in writing within fifteen (15) calendar days after the delivery of the decision appealed from. This requirement may be waived in a particular case for good cause by the president or the board committee as the case may be. Within three (3) calendar days of the receipt of any appeal, either to the president or the board commit- tee on student affairs and special programs, the non- appealing party shall be sent a written notice of the other party’s appeal. In addition, the respondent and/or the complainant shall have the opportunity to submit a written opposition to the other party’s appeal within fifteen (15) calendar days of the delivery of the notice of receipt of such appeal

The president shall decide and issue a decision within fifteen (15) calendar days of receiving the appeal or within fifteen (15) calendar days of receiving papers  in opposition to the appeal, whichever is longer. The board committee shall decide and issue a decision within five (5) calendar days of the meeting at which it hears the appeal.

ii.      Transcript Notation(s)

In cases in which the panel finds the respondent responsible and the penalty is either suspension or expulsion, the college shall place a notation on the respondent’s transcript stating that respondent was suspended or expelled after a finding of responsibility for a code of conduct violation. In cases where a student has been expelled as a result of a Clery Act crime of violence, the notation will not be removed.

For all other cases, after four years from the date of the conclusion of the disciplinary proceeding, or one year after the conclusion of any suspension, whichever is later, the Respondent has the right to request that a transcript notation from a finding of responsibility be removed. If a finding of responsibility for any violation is vacated for any reason, the notation shall be removed.

XIII. College Obligations Under This Policy

In Addition to Addressing Possible Violations of This Policy, Colleges/Units of CUNY Have the Following Obligations:

a.        Dissemination of Policies, Procedures and Notices

The college Title IX Coordinator, in coordination with the Office of Student Affairs, Office of Public Safety, Human Resources Department and other appropriate offices, is responsible for the wide dissemination of the following on her/his campus: (i) this Policy; (ii) CUNY’s Notice of Non- Discrimination; (iii) the Title IX Coordinator’s name, phone number, office location, and email address; and (iv) contact information for the campus Public Safety Office. Such dissemination shall include posting the documents and information on the college website, and including it in residence life materials and training and educational materials. In addition, the Students’ Bill of Rights, which is appended to and made a part of this policy, must be distributed to any individual reporting an incident of sexual misconduct at the time the report is made. It must also be distributed annually to all students, made available on the college’s website and posted in college campus centers and in CUNY owned and operated housing.

b.        Training and Educational Programming

CUNY is responsible for providing training to college Title IX Coordinators and others who may serve as investigators. The college Title IX Coordinator, in coordination with other applicable offices, including Public Safety, Human Resources and Student Affairs, is responsible for ensuring that the college provides training to college employees on their obligations under this policy; provides education on this policy and on sexual misconduct (including domestic violence, dating violence, stalking and sexual assault) to new and continuing students; and promotes awareness and prevention of sexual misconduct among all students and employees. Specific required training's include the following:

i.       Training For Responsible and Confidential Employees The college shall provide training to all employees who are required to report incidents of sexual misconduct under this policy, as well as those employees who have been designated as confidential employees.

ii.      Training For Title IX Coordinator and other investigators CUNY shall provide at least annual training to Title IX Coordinators and other investigators in conducting investigations of sexual misconduct, including

•        The effects of trauma;

•        Impartiality;

•        The rights of the respondent, include the right to a presumption that the respondent is “not responsible” until any finding of responsibility is made;

•        Relevant CUNY policies and procedures; and

•        Other issues including what constitutes crimes of sexual misconduct.

iii.     Student Onboarding and Ongoing Education Each college shall adopt a comprehensive student onboarding and ongoing education campaign to educate students about sexual misconduct, including domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, and sexual assault. During the student onboarding process, all  new first-year and transfer students shall receive training on this policy and on a variety of topics relating to sexual misconduct. In addition, each college shall offer and administer appropriate educational programming to residence hall students, athletes, and student leaders. Each college shall also provide such educational programming to any other student groups which the college determines could benefit from education in the area of sexual misconduct. The college shall also share information on domestic violence, dating violence, stalking and sexual assault prevention with parents of enrolling students. This may be done by linking to http://www1.cuny.edu/sites/title-ix/information-for-parents-and-families/campus/university/

c.     Campus Climate Assessments

Each college of the University shall conduct, no less than every other year, a climate assessment using an assessment instrument provided by the University central office, to ascertain its students’ general awareness and knowledge of the University’s policy and procedures regarding sexual misconduct, including but not limited to student experiences with and knowledge of reporting, investigation and disciplinary processes. The assessment instrument shall include all topics required to be included under applicable law, including Section 129-B of the New York State Education Law. The University shall publish the results of the surveys on its Title IX web page. The published results shall not contain any information which would enable a reader to identify any individual who responded to the climate assessment.

Rules Regarding Intimate Relationships

a.        Relationships between Faculty or Employees and Students

Amorous, dating or sexual activity or relationships (“intimate relationships”), even when apparently consensual, are inappropriate when they occur between a faculty member or employee and any student for whom he or she has a professional responsibility. Those relationships are inappropriate because of the unequal power dynamic between students and faculty members and between students and employees who advise or evaluate them, such as athletic coaches or workplace supervisors. Such relationships necessarily involve issues of student vulnerability and have the potential for coercion. In addition, conflicts of interest or perceived conflicts of interest may arise when a faculty member or employee is required to evaluate the work or make personnel or academic decisions with respect to a student with whom he or she is having an intimate relationship. Finally, if the relationship ends in a way that is not amicable, the relationship may lead to charges of and possible liability for sexual misconduct.

Therefore, faculty members and other employees are prohibited from engaging in intimate relationships with students for whom they have a professional responsibility, including undergraduates, graduate and professional students and postdoctoral fellows.

For purposes of this Section, professional responsibility for a student means responsibility over any academic matters, including teaching, counseling, grading, advising for a formal project such as a thesis or research, evaluating, hiring, super- vising, coaching, making decisions or recommendations that confer benefits such as admissions, registration, financial aid, other awards, remuneration, or fellowships, or performing any other function that might affect teaching, research, or other academic opportunities.

b.        Relationships between Supervisors and Employees

Many of the concerns about intimate relationships between faculty members or employees and students also apply to relationships between supervisors and employees they supervise. Those relationships therefore are strongly discouraged. Supervisors shall disclose any such relationships to their supervisors in order to avoid or mitigate conflicts of interest in connection with the supervision and evaluation of the employees with whom they have an intimate relationship. Mitigation may involve the transfer of either the supervisor or employee, reassigning the responsibility to evaluate the employee to a different supervisor, or other appropriate action.

For purposes of this Section, supervising an employee means supervising in an employment setting, including hiring, evaluating, assigning work, or making decisions or recommendations that confer benefits such as promotions, raises or other remuneration, or performing any other function that might affect employment opportunities.


The City University of New York Students’ Bill of Rights

For CUNY students who experience Sexual Violence, including sexual assault; domestic, dating or, intimate partner violence, stalking or voyeurism

All students have the right to

1.   Make a report to local law enforcement and/or state police;

2.   Have disclosures of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, and sexual assault treated seriously;

3.   Make a decision about whether or not to disclose a crime or violation and participate in the judicial or conduct process and/or criminal justice process free from pressure by the institution;

4.   Participate in a process that is fair, impartial, and provides adequate notice and a meaningful opportunity to be heard;

5.   Be treated with dignity and to receive from the institution courteous, fair, and respectful health care and counseling services, where available;

6.   Be free from any suggestion that the reporting individual is at fault when these crimes and violations are committed, or should have acted in a different manner to avoid such crimes or violations;

7.   Describe the incident to as few institutional representatives as practicable and not be required to unnecessarily repeat a description of the incident;

8.   Be protected from retaliation by the institution, any student, the accused and/or the respondent, and/or their friends, family and acquaintances within the jurisdiction of the institution;

9.   Have access to at least one level of appeal of a determination;

  1. Be accompanied by an advisor of choice who may assist and advise a reporting individual, accused, or respondent throughout the judicial or conduct process including during all meetings and hearings related to such process; and

  2. Exercise civil rights and practice of religion without interference by the investigative, criminal justice, or judicial or con- duct process of the institution.

This Student Bill of Rights was established by the “Enough is Enough” Law, New York State Education Law Article 129-B, effective October 7, 2015.

For more information about preventing and addressing Sexual Violence at CUNY see http://www1.cuny.edu/sites/title-ix/campus-websites.

Information about filing a report, seeking a response, and options for confidential disclosure is available also available CUNY’s Title IX web page ( http://www1.cuny.edu/sites/title- ix/campus-websites/campus/university/ ).

Questions about CUNY’s Sexual Misconduct policy and procedures may be directed to your campus Title IX Coordinator. See below.

Policy adopted by the Board of Trustees on 12/1/2014 Cal. 4.C., with effective date of 1/1/2015. Amended by the Board of Trustees on 10/1/2015. Cal. 6.B.

For Further Information Contact:

 Title IX Coordinator: Belinda Delgado, Esq., Administration Building, Room 413 (718) 281-5755 bdelgado@qcc.cuny.edu
Public Safety Director:
John M. Triolo, Library, 3rd Floor (718) 631-6320 jtriolo@qcc.cuny.edu
Chief Student Affairs Officer: V.P. Brian Kerr, Library Building, Room 412 (718) 631-6351 bkerr@qcc.cuny.edu
Human Resources Dean: Liza Larios, Administration Building, Room 505 (718) 631-6356 llarios@qcc.cuny.edu
Chief Diversity Officer: Josephine Pantaleo, Administration Building, Room 309 (718) 631-6391 jpantaleo@qcc.cuny.edu
Counseling Center (confidential source): Library Building, Room 422 (718) 631-6370 http://www.qcc.cuny.edu/counseling/
Office of Health Services (confidential source):
Medical Arts Lower Level, Room MC-02 (718) 631-6375 HealthServices@ qcc.cuny.edu

In addition, the College’s Title IX website, http://www.qcc.cuny.edu/titleix, and CUNY’s Title IX website, http://www1.cuny.edu/sites/title-ix/campus/university/,  contain  important  information on topics such as reporting an incident, confidentiality, getting medical care and emotional support, and ways to support someone who has experienced sexual harassment. The College’s Campus Safety guide also has important safety information on sexual assault and acquaintance rape http://www.qcc.cuny.edu/publicSafety/docs/Campus-Safety-Guideline.pdf.

University Regulations Governing Student Conduct on Campus

NOTE: The regulations governing student conduct at the college may change through the course of the academic year in accordance with The City University of New York (CUNY) policy and guidelines, for the most up-to-date information regarding these policies please visit www2.cuny.edu/about/administration/offices/ovsa/policies/.

Student Code of Conduct

Academic institutions exist for the transmission of knowledge, the pursuit of truth, the development of students, and the general well-being of society. Student participation, responsibility, academic freedom, and due process are essential to the operation of the academic enterprise. As members of the academic community, students should be encouraged to develop the capacity for critical judgment and to engage in a sustained and independent search for truth.

Freedom to learn and to explore major social, political, and economic issues are necessary adjuncts to student academic freedom, as is freedom from discrimination, as set forth in the university’s non-discrimination policy.

Freedom to learn and freedom to teach are inseparable facets of academic freedom. The concomitant of this freedom is responsibility. If members of the academic community are to develop positively in their freedom; if these rights are to be secure, then students should exercise their freedom with responsibility.

Conduct Standard Defined (Section 15.1)

Each student enrolled or in attendance in any college, school or unit under the control of the board and every student organization, association, publication, club or chapter shall obey

(1)    the laws of the city, state and nation; (2) the bylaws and resolutions of the board, including the rules and regulations for the maintenance of public order pursuant to article 129-a of the education law (“Henderson rules”); and (3) the governance plan, policies, regulations, and orders of the college.

Such laws, bylaws, resolutions, policies, rules, regulations and orders shall, of course, be limited by the right of students to the freedoms of speech, press, assembly and petition as construed by the courts.

 Student Organizations (Section 15.2)

a.    Any group of students may form an organization, association, club or chapter by filing with the duly elected student government organization of the college or school at which they are enrolled or in attendance and with an officer to be designated by the chief student affairs officer of the college or school at which they are enrolled or in attendance

(1)   the name and purposes of the organization, association, club or chapter, (2) the names and addresses of its president and secretary or other officers corresponding in function to president and secretary.

The board recognizes that students have rights to free expression and association. At the same time, the board strongly believes that respect for all members of the university’s diverse community is an essential attribute of a great university.

b.   Extra-curricular activities at each college or school shall be regulated by the duly elected student government organization to insure the effective conduct of such college or school as an institution of higher learning and for the prevention of activities which are hereafter proscribed or which violate the standards of conduct of the character set forth in bylaw 15.1.

Such powers shall include:

1.      The power to charter or otherwise authorize teams (excluding intercollegiate athletics), publications, organizations, associations, clubs or chapters, and, when appropriate in the exercise of such regulatory power, the power to refuse, suspend or revoke any charter or other authorization for cause after hearing on notice.

2.      The power to delegate responsibility for the effective implementation of its regulatory functions here under to any officer or committee which it may appoint.

c    1.   Any person or organization affiliated with the college may file a complaint with the chief student affairs officer if there is reason to believe that a student organization has violated any of the standards of conduct set forth in section 15.1 above. The chief student affairs officer shall promptly notify the affected organization, investigate any complaint and report the results of that investigation along with a recommendation for appropriate action to the complainant and the student government which shall take action as it deems appropriate, except that in the case of a complaint against the student government itself, the chief student affairs officer shall report the results of the investigation and the recommendation for appropriate action directly to the president.

2.   The complainant or any student organization adversely affected by the action of the student government pursuant to subparagraph c (1) above may appeal to the president. The president may take such action as he or she deems appropriate, and such action shall be final.

d.   Each college shall establish a student elections review committee in consultation with the various student governments. The student elections review committee shall approve the election procedures and certify the results of elections for student governments, and student body referenda. Decisions of the student elections review committee may be appealed to the college president, whose decision shall be final. An appeal from the decision of the student elections review committee must be made in writing to the President within ten (10) calendar days of the decision. The President shall consult with the student elections review committee and render a decision as expeditiously as possible which may affirm, reverse, or modify the decision of the student elections review committee.

e.   Student government elections shall be scheduled and conducted, and newly elected student governments shall take office, in accordance with policies of the board, and implementing regulations.

The University Student Senate (Section 15.3)

There shall be a university student senate responsible, subject to the board of trustees, for the formulation of university-wide student policy relating to the academic status, role, rights and freedoms of the student. The authority and duties of the university student senate shall not extend to areas of interest which fall exclusively within the domain of the student governments of the constituent units of the university. Consistent with the authority of the board of trustees in accordance with the education law and the bylaws of the board of trustees, the university student senate shall make its own bylaws providing for the election of its own officers, the establishment of its own rules and procedures, for its internal administration and for such other matters as is necessary for its existence. The university student senate shall have the full rights and responsibilities accorded student organizations as provided in these bylaws. The delegates and alternate delegates to the university student senate shall be elected by their respective constituencies, or by their student governments from the elected members of the respective student governments

Student Disciplinary Procedures (Section 15.4)

Complaint procedures:

a.    A University student, employee, visitor, organization or department who/which believes she/he/it is the victim of a student’s misconduct (hereinafter “complainant”) may make a charge, accusation, or allegation against a student (hereinafter “respondent”) which if proved, may subject the respondent to disciplinary action. Such charge, accusation, or allegation must be communicated to the chief student affairs officer of the college the respondent attends.

b.   The chief student affairs officer of the college or her or his designee shall conduct a preliminary investigation in order to determine whether disciplinary charges should be preferred. The chief student affairs officer or her or his designee shall advise the respondent of the allegation against her or him, explain to the respondent and the complainant their rights, consult with other parties who may be involved or who have information regarding the incident, and review other relevant evidence. The preliminary investigation shall be concluded within thirty (30) calendar days of the filing of the complaint, unless: (i) said complaint involves two or more complainants or respondents; or (ii) said complaint involves a matter that is also under investigation by law enforcement authorities. In those cases, the preliminary investigation shall be completed within sixty (60) calendar days. Further, if the matter has been previously investigated pursuant to the Board of Trustees Policy Against Sex-Based Harassment and Sexual Violence, the chief student affairs officer shall dispense with a preliminary investigation and rely on the report completed by the Title IX Coordinator. Following the completion of the preliminary investigation, the chief student affairs officer or designee shall take one of the following actions:

(i)      Dismiss the matter if there is no basis for the allegation(s) or the allegation(s) does not warrant disciplinary actions. The individuals involved shall be notified that the complaint has been dismissed;

(ii)     Refer the matter to mediation (except in cases involving allegations of sexual assault, stalking or other forms of sexual violence); or

(iii)    Prefer formal disciplinary charges.

a.    In the event that a respondent withdraws from the college after a charge, accusation or allegation against a respondent has been made, and the college prefers formal disciplinary charges, the respondent is required to participate in the disciplinary hearing or otherwise to resolve the pending charges and shall be barred from attending any other unit of the university until a decision on the charges is made or the charges are otherwise resolved. If the respondent fails to appear the college may proceed with the disciplinary hearing in absentia, and any decision and sanction shall be binding.

Mediation Conference:

b.   The college may offer the respondent and the complainant the opportunity to participate in a mediation conference prior to the time the disciplinary hearing takes place in an effort to resolve the matter by mutual agreement (except in cases involving sexual assault, stalking and other forms of sexual violence). The conference shall be conducted by a qualified staff or faculty member designated by the chief student affairs officer. The following procedures shall be in effect at this conference:

1.      An effort shall be made to resolve the matter by mutual agreement.

2.      If an agreement is reached, the faculty or staff member conducting the conference shall report his/her recommendation to the chief student affairs officer  for approval and, if approved, the complainant and the respondent shall be notified, and a written memorandum shall be created memorializing the resolution and any consequences for noncompliance.

3.      If no agreement is reached within a reasonable time, or if the respondent fails to appear, the faculty or staff member conducting the conference shall refer the matter back to the chief student affairs officer who may prefer disciplinary charges.

4.      The faculty or staff member conducting the mediation conference is precluded from testifying in a college hearing regarding information received during the mediation conference, or presenting the case on behalf of the college.

Notice of Hearing and Charges, and Pre-Hearing Document Inspection:

c.    Notice of the charge(s) and of the time and place of the hearing shall be personally delivered to the respondent, or sent by certified or overnight mail and email to the respondent’s CUNY-assigned email address. Notice shall also be sent in a similar manner to the complainant to the extent the charges relate to her/him/it. The chief student affairs officer is also encouraged to send the notice of charges to any other e-mail address that he or she may have for the respondent and the complainant. The hearing shall be scheduled within a reasonable time following the filing of the charges or the mediation conference. Notice of at least seven (7) calendar days shall be given to the respondent in advance of the hearing unless the respondent consents to an earlier hearing.

The respondent is permitted one (1) adjournment as of right. Additional requests for an adjournment must be made at least five (5) calendar days prior to the hearing date, and shall be granted or denied at the discretion of the chairperson of the faculty-student disciplinary committee. If the respondent fails to respond to the notice, appear on the adjourned date, or request an extension, the college may proceed in absentia, and any decision and sanction shall be binding.

d.   The notice shall contain the following:

1.      A complete and itemized statement of the charge(s) being brought against the respondent including the rule, bylaw or regulation she/he is charged with violating, and the possible penalties for such violation.

2.      A statement that the respondent and the complainant have the right to attend and participate fully in the hearing including the right:

(i)         To present their side of the story;

(ii)        To present witnesses and evidence on their behalf;

(iii)       To cross-examine witnesses presenting evidence;

(iv)       To remain silent without assumption of guilt; and

(v)        To be represented by an advisor or legal counsel at their expense; if the respondent or the complainant request it, the college shall assist in finding a legal counsel or advisor.

3.      A warning that anything the respondent says may be used against her/him at a non-college hearing.

4.      At least five (5) calendar days prior to the commencement of a student disciplinary hearing, the college shall provide the respondent and the complainant and/or their designated representative, with similar and timely access to review any documents or other tangible evidence that the college intends to use at the disciplinary hearing, consistent with the restrictions imposed by Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (“FERPA”). Should the college seek to introduce additional documents or other tangible evidence during, or some time prior to, the disciplinary hearing, the respondent and the complainant shall be afforded the opportunity to review the additional documents or tangible evidence. If during the hearing the respondent submits documentary evidence, the chairperson may, at the request of either the college or the complainant, direct the respondent to produce such other documents as may be necessary in the interest of fairness.

Emergency Suspension:

e.    The president or her/his designee may in emergency or extraordinary circumstances, temporarily suspend a student pending an early hearing as provided in this bylaw section 15.4. to take place within not more than twelve (12) calendar days, unless the student requests an adjournment. Such suspension shall be for conduct which impedes, obstructs, impairs or interferes with the orderly and continuous administration and operation of any college, school, or unit of the university in the use of its facilities or in the achievement  of its purposes as an educational institution. Prior to the commencement of a temporary suspension of a student, the college shall give the student oral notice (which shall be confirmed via email to the address appearing on the records of the college) or written notice of the charges against her/him and, if she/he denies them, the college shall forthwith give the student an informal oral explanation of the evidence supporting the charges and the student may present informally her/his explanation or theory of the matter. When a student’s presence poses a continuing danger to person or property or an ongoing threat of disrupting the academic process, notice and opportunity for denial and explanation may follow suspension, but shall be given as soon as feasible thereafter. The complainant shall be notified in the event that an emergency suspension is imposed against a student, and/or when the suspension is subsequently lifted to the extent that the suspension involves the complainant in the same manner notice is given to the student.

Faculty-Student Disciplinary Committee Structure:

a.   Each faculty-student disciplinary committee shall consist of two (2) faculty members or one (1) faculty member and one

(1)   Member of the Higher Education Officer series (HEO), and two (2) student members and a chairperson, who shall be a faculty member. A quorum shall consist of the chairperson and any two (2) members, one of whom must be a student. Hearings shall be scheduled promptly (including during the summers) at a convenient time and efforts shall be made to insure full student and faculty representation.

b. The president shall select in consultation with the head of the appropriate campus governance body or where the president is the head of the governance body, its executive committee, three (3) members of the faculty of that college to receive training and to serve in rotation as chairperson of the disciplinary committee. The following schools shall be required to select two (2) chairpersons:, CUNY School of Law, Guttman Community College, CUNY School of Professional Studies, and the CUNY School of Journalism. If none of the chairpersons appointed from the campus can serve, the president, at her/his discretion, may request that a chairperson be selected by lottery from the entire group of chairpersons appointed by other colleges. The chairperson shall preside at all meetings of the faculty-student disciplinary committee and decide and make all rulings for the committee. She/he shall not be a voting member of the committee but shall vote in the event of a tie.

c. The faculty members shall be selected by lot from a panel  of six (6) elected biennially by the appropriate faculty body from among the persons having faculty rank or faculty status. CUNY School of Law, Guttman Community College, CUNY School of Professional Studies, and the CUNY School of Journalism shall be required to select four (4) faculty members. The HEO members shall be selected by lot from a panel of six (6) HEO appointed biennially by the president. CUNY School of Law, Guttman Community College, CUNY School of Professional Studies, and the CUNY School of Journalism shall be required to select four (4) HEO’s. The student members shall be selected by lot from a panel of  six (6) elected annually in an election in which all students registered at the college shall be eligible to vote. CUNY School of Law, Guttman Community College, CUNY School of Professional Studies, and the CUNY School of Journalism shall be required to select four (4) students. In the event that the student or faculty panel or both are not elected, or if more panel members are needed, the president shall have the duty to select the panel or panels which have not been elected. No individuals on the panel shall serve on the panel for more  than four (4) consecutive years. Notwithstanding the above, in cases of sexual assault, stalking and other forms of sexual violence, the president shall designate one (1) chairperson, two

(2)    Faculty/HEO members, and two (2) students, who shall be specially trained, and who shall constitute the faculty-student disciplinary committee in all such cases.

d.  In the event that the chairperson cannot continue, the president shall appoint another chairperson. In the event that a seat becomes vacant and it is necessary to fill the seat to continue the hearing, the seat shall be filled from the respective faculty, HEO, or student panel by lottery.

e. Each academic year, the chief student affairs officer, and her or his designee, shall appoint/identify one or more college employees to serve as presenters for the hearings. This list shall be forwarded to the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, and the Office of the General Counsel and Sr. Vice Chancellor for Legal Affairs prior to the first day of the academic year.

f.    Persons who are to be participants in the hearings as witnesses or have been involved in preferring the charges or who may participate in the appeals procedures or any other person having a direct interest in the outcome of the hearing shall be disqualified from serving on the committee.

Faculty-Student Disciplinary Committee Procedures:

g.   The following procedures shall apply at the hearing before the faculty-student disciplinary committee:

1.      The chairperson shall preside at the hearing. The chairperson shall inform the student of the charges, the hearing procedures and her or his rights.

2.      All faculty student disciplinary committee hearings  are closed hearings, but the respondent has the right to request an open public hearing. However, the chairperson has the right to deny the request and hold a closed hearing when an open public hearing would adversely affect and be disruptive to the committee’s normal operations, or when the complainant in a case involving allegations of sexual assault, stalking, or other forms of sexual violence requests a closed hearing. In the event of an open hearing, the respondent must sign a written waiver acknowledging that those present will hear the evidence introduced at the hearing.

1.      After informing the respondent of the charges, the hearing procedures, and her or his rights, the chairperson shall ask the respondent to respond. If the respondent admits the conduct charged, the respondent shall be given an opportunity to explain her/his actions before the committee and the college shall be given an opportunity to respond and present evidence regarding the appropriate penalty. If the respondent denies the conduct charged, the college shall present its case. At the conclusion of the college’s case, the respondent may move to dismiss the charges. If the motion is denied by the committee, the respondent shall be given an opportunity to present her or his defense.

2.      Prior to accepting testimony at the hearing, the chairperson shall rule on any motions questioning the impartiality of any committee member or the adequacy of the notice of the charge(s). Subsequent thereto, the chairperson may rule on the admissibility of the evidence and may exclude irrelevant, unreliable or unduly repetitive evidence. In addition, if either party wishes to question the impartiality of a committee member on the basis of evidence which was not previously available at the inception of the hearing, the chairperson may rule on such a motion. The chairperson shall exclude from the hearing room all persons who are to appear as witnesses, except  the respondent and the complainant.

3.      The college shall make a record of each fact-finding hearing by some means such as a stenographic transcript, an audio recording or the equivalent. The college must assign a staff member for each hearing, with the sole responsibility of ensuring that the hearing is recorded in its entirety. No other recording of the proceedings may be permitted. A respondent who has been found to have committed the conduct charged after a hearing is entitled upon request to a copy of such a record without cost upon the condition that it is not to be disseminated except to the respondent’s representative or attorney. In the event of an appeal, both the respondent and the complainant are entitled upon request to a copy of such a record without cost, upon the condition that it is not to be disseminated except to their representatives or attorneys.

4.      The college bears the burden of proving the charge(s) by a preponderance of the evidence.

5.      The role of the faculty-student disciplinary committee is to listen to the testimony, ask questions of the witnesses, review the testimony and evidence presented at the hearing and the papers filed by the parties and render a determination. In the event the respondent is found to have committed the conduct charged, the committee shall then determine the penalty to be imposed.

6.      The college, the respondent and the complainant are permitted to have lawyers or other representatives act on their behalf during the pendency of a disciplinary action, which shall include the calling and examining of witnesses, and presenting other evidence. Any party intending to appear with an attorney shall give the other party 5 (five) calendar days’ notice of such representation.

7.      The chairperson of the faculty-student disciplinary committee retains discretion to limit the number of witnesses and the time of testimony for the presentations by any party and/or their representative.

8.     In the event that the respondent is charged with a sexual assault, stalking or other forms of sexual violence, neither the respondent nor the complainant shall be permitted to cross-examine the other directly. Rather, if they wish to, the respondent and the complainant may cross-examine each other only through a representative. If either or both of them do not have a representative, the college shall work with them to find a representative to conduct such cross-examination. In the alternative, either party may provide written questions to the chairperson to be posed to the witness.

9.    At the end of the presentations, the respondent and the complainant may introduce individual character references. The college may introduce a copy of the respondent’s previous disciplinary record, including records from any CUNY institution the respondent has attended, where applicable, provided the respondent was shown a copy of the record prior to the commencement of the hearing. The previous disciplinary record shall be submitted to the committee in a sealed envelope, bearing the respondent’s signature across the seal, and shall only be opened if the respondent has been found to have committed the conduct charged. The previous disciplinary records, as well as documents and character evidence introduced by the respondent, the complainant, and the college shall be opened and used by the committee for dispositional purposes, i.e., to determine an appropriate penalty if the charges are sustained.

10.  The committee shall deliberate in closed session. The committee shall issue a written decision, which shall be based solely on the testimony and evidence presented at the hearing and the papers filed by the parties.

11.  The respondent shall be sent a copy of the faculty- student disciplinary committee’s decision within seven

(7) calendar days of the conclusion of the hearing, by regular mail and e-mail to the address appearing on the records of the college. In cases involving two or more complainants or respondents, the respondent shall be sent a copy of faculty-student disciplinary committee’s decision within fourteen (14) calendar days of the conclusion of the hearing. The chief student affairs officer is also encouraged to send the decision to any other e-mail address that he or she may have for the respondent. The decision shall be final subject to any appeal. In cases involving a crime of violence or a non-forcible sex offense, as set forth in FERPA, the complainant shall simultaneously receive notice of the outcome of the faculty-student disciplinary committee’s decision as it relates to the offense(s) committed against the complainant, in the same manner as notice is given to the respondent.

1.    When a disciplinary hearing results in a penalty of dismissal or suspension for one term or more, the decision is a university-wide penalty and the student shall be barred from admission to, or attendance at, any other unit of the university while the penalty is being served.

2.    Disciplinary penalties shall be placed on a respondent’s transcript unless a mediation agreement, the committee’s decision, or the decision on any appeal under  section 15.4(o) below, expressly indicate otherwise.

For all undergraduate students, a penalty other than suspension or expulsion shall be removed from the respondent’s transcript upon the request of the respondent after at least four (4) years have elapsed since the penalty was completed, unless the respondent has been found to have committed a subsequent violation pursuant to this Article. The chief student affairs officer shall be responsible for having any penalty removed from a student’s transcript as provided above.

Appeals

a.    A respondent or a complainant may appeal a decision of the faculty-student disciplinary committee to the president on the following grounds: (i) procedural error, (ii) newly discovered evidence that was not reasonably available at the time of the hearing, or (iii) the disproportionate nature of the penalty. The president may remand for a new hearing or may modify the penalty either by decreasing it (on an appeal by the respondent) or increasing it (on an appeal by the complainant). If the president is a party to the dispute, her/his functions with respect to an appeal shall be discharged by an official of the university to be appointed by the chancellor or her or his designee. If the penalty after appeal to the president is one of dismissal or suspension for one term or more,  a respondent or a complainant may appeal to the board committee on student affairs and special programs. The board may dispose of the appeal in the same manner as the president.

b.   An appeal under this section shall be made in writing within fifteen (15) calendar days after the delivery of the decision appealed from. This requirement may be waived in a particular case for good cause by the president or the board committee as the case may be. Within three (3) calendar days of the receipt of any appeal, either to the president or the board committee on student affairs and special programs, the appealing party shall be sent a written notice of the other party’s appeal. In addition, the respondent and/or the complainant shall have the opportunity to submit a written opposition to the other party’s appeal within fifteen (15) calendar days of the delivery of the notice of receipt of such appeal.

c.    The president shall decide and issue a decision within fifteen

(15) Calendar days of receiving the appeal or within fifteen

(15) Calendar days of receiving papers in opposition to the appeal, whichever is longer. The board committee shall decide and issue a decision within five (5) calendar days of the meeting at which it hears the appeal.

Section 15.5. Action By The Board of Trustees

Notwithstanding the foregoing provisions of this article, the board of trustees reserves full power to suspend or take other appropriate action against a student or a student organization for conduct which impedes, obstructs, or interferes with the orderly and continuous administration and operation of any college, school, or units of the university in the use of its facilities or in the achievement of its purposes as an educational institution in accordance with procedures established by the board of trustees.

Section 15.6. College Governance Plans

The provisions in a duly adopted college governance plan shall not be inconsistent with the provisions contained in this article.

Rules and Regulations for the Maintenance of Public Order Pursuant to Article 129A of the Education Law

The tradition of the university as a sanctuary of academic freedom and center of informed discussion is an honored one, to be guarded vigilantly. The basic significance of that sanctuary lies in the protection of intellectual freedom: the rights of professors to teach, of scholars to engage in the advancement of knowledge, of students to learn and to express their views, free from external pressures or interference. These freedoms can flourish only in an atmosphere of mutual respect, civility and trust among teachers and students, only when members of the university community are willing to accept self-restraint and reciprocity as the condition upon which they share in its intellectual autonomy.

Academic freedom and the sanctuary of the University campus extend to all who share these aims and responsibilities. They cannot be invoked by those who would subordinate intellectual freedom to political ends, or who violate the norms of conduct established to protect that freedom. Against such offenders the University has the right, and indeed the obligation, to defend itself. We accordingly announce the following rules and regulations to be in effect at each of our colleges which are to be administered in accordance with the requirements of due process as provided in the Bylaws of the Board of Higher Education.

With respect to enforcement of these rules and regulations we note that the Bylaws of the Board of Trustees provide that:

Section 11.4 The President

The president, with respect to his/her educational unit, shall:

A.   Have the affirmative responsibility of conserving and enhancing the educational standards and general academic excellence of the college under his/her jurisdiction. Such responsibility shall include but not be limited to the duty to recommend to the chancellor for appointment, promotion, and the granting of tenure only those persons who he/she is reasonably certain will contribute to the improvement of academic excellence at the college. These recommendations shall be consistent with the immediate and long range objectives of the college.

B.   Be an advisor and executive agent of the chancellor and have the immediate supervision with full discretionary power to carry into effect the bylaws, resolutions, and policies of the board, the lawful resolutions of any board committees, and policies, programs, and lawful resolutions of the several faculties and students where appropriate.

C.   Exercise general superintendence over the facilities, concerns, officers, employees, and students of his/her college; in consultation with the chancellor, prepare and implement the college master plan, which shall be subject to the approval of the chancellor and the board.

1.   Rules

1.   A member of the academic community shall not intentionally obstruct and/or forcibly prevent others from the exercise of their rights. Nor shall he interfere with the institution’s educational processes or facilities, or the rights of those who wish to avail themselves of any of the institution’s instructional, personal, administrative, recreational, and community services.

2.   Individuals are liable for failure to comply with lawful directions issued by representatives of the University/college when they are acting in their official capacities. Members of the academic community are required to show their identification cards when requested to do so by an official of the college.

3  Unauthorized occupancy of University/college facilities or blocking access to or from such areas is prohibited. Permission from appropriate college authorities must be obtained for removal, relocation and use of University/ college equipment and/or supplies.

4.   Theft from, or damage to University/college premises or property, or theft of or damage to property of any person on University/college premises, is prohibited.

5.   Each member of the academic community or an invited guest has the right to advocate his position without having to fear abuse, physical, verbal, or otherwise, from others supporting conflicting points of view. Members of the academic community and other persons on the college grounds shall not use language or take actions reasonably likely to provoke or encourage physical violence by demonstrators, those demonstrated against, or spectators.

6.   Action may be taken against any and all persons who have no legitimate reason for their presence on any campus within the University/college, or whose presence on any such campus obstructs and/or forcibly prevents others from the exercise of their rights or interferes with the institution’s educational processes or facilities, or the rights of those who wish to avail themselves of any of the institution’s instructional, personal, administrative, recreational, and community services.

7.   Disorderly or indecent conduct on University/college-owned or controlled property is prohibited.

8.   No individual shall have in his or her possession a rifle, shot- gun or firearm or knowingly have in his or her possession any other dangerous instruments or material that can be used to inflict bodily harm on an individual or damage upon a building or the grounds of the University/college without the written authorization of such educational institution. Nor shall any individual have in his or her possession any other instrument or material which can be used and is intended to inflict bodily harm on an individual or damage upon a building or the grounds of the University/college.

9.   Any action or situation which recklessly or intentionally endangers mental or physical health or involves the forced consumption of liquor or drugs for the purpose of initiation into or affiliation with any organization is prohibited.

10.   The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of illegal drugs or other controlled substances by University students or employees on University/college premises, or as part of any University/college activities is prohibited. Employees of the University must also notify the College Personnel Director of any criminal drug statute conviction for a violation occurring in the workplace not later than five (5) days after such conviction.

11.   The unlawful possession, use, or distribution of alcohol by students or employees on University/college premises or as part of any University/college activities is prohibited.

2. Penalties

1.   Any student engaging in any manner in conduct prohibited under substantive Rules 1-11 shall be subject to the following range of sanctions as hereafter defined in the attached Appendix: admonition, warning, censure, disciplinary probation, restitution, suspension, expulsions, ejection and/or arrest by the civil authorities.

2.   Any tenured or nontenured faculty member or other member of the instructional staff, or member of the classified staff engaging in any manner in conduct prohibited under substantive Rules 1-11 shall be subject to the following range of penalties: warning, censure, restitution, fine not exceeding those permitted by law or by the Bylaws of The City University of New York or suspension with/without pay pending a hearing before an appropriate college authority, dismissal after a hearing, ejection, and/or arrest by the civil authorities, and, for engaging in any manner in conduct prohibited under substantive Rule 10, may, in the alternative, be required to participate satisfactorily in an appropriately licensed drug treatment or rehabilitation program. A tenured or non-tenured faculty member, or other member of the Instructional staff, or member of the classified staff charged with engaging in any manner in conduct prohibited under substantive Rules 1-11 shall be entitled to be treated in accordance with applicable provisions of the Education Law, or the Civil Service Law, or the applicable collective bargaining agreement, or the Bylaws or written policies of The City University of New York.

1.   Any visitor, licensee, or invitee engaging in any manner in conduct prohibited under substantive Rules 1-11 shall be subject to ejection, and/or arrest by the civil authorities.

2.   Any organization which authorized the conduct prohibited under substantive Rules 1-11 shall have its permission to operate on campus rescinded.

Penalties 1-4 shall be in addition to any other penalty provided by law or The City University Trustees.

Appendix-Sanctions Defined:

A. Admonition. An oral statement to the offender that he or she has violated University rules.

B.   Warning. Notice to the offender, orally or in writing, that continuation or repetition of the wrongful conduct, within a period of time stated in the warning, may be cause for more severe disciplinary action.

C.   Censure. Written reprimand for violation of specified regulation, including the possibility of more severe disciplinary sanction in the event of conviction for the violation of any University regulation within a period stated in the letter of reprimand.

D.   Disciplinary Probation. Exclusion from participation in privileges or extracurricular university activities as set forth in the notice of disciplinary probation for a specified period of time.

E.  Restitution. Reimbursement for damage to or misappropriation of property. Reimbursement may take the form of appropriate service to repair or otherwise compensate for damages.

F.   Suspension. Exclusion from classes and other privileges or activities as set forth in the notice of suspension for a definite period of time.

G. Expulsion. Termination of student status for an indefinite period. The conditions of readmission, if any is permitted, shall be stated in the order of expulsion.

H. Complaint to Civil Authorities.

I. Ejection.

Board of Trustees Minutes, 1969,06-23,3,B. Amended: Board of Trustees Minutes,1980,10-27,7,A; Board of Trustees Minutes, 1989,05-22,8,D; Board of Trustees Minutes, 1990,06-25,6,C

Quoted Section of Bylaws Amended: Board of Trustees Minutes, 1971, 03-21,1,a; Board of Trustees Minutes, 1999,10-24,9,A

The City University of New York Policy on Drugs and Alcohol

The City University of New York (“CUNY”) is an institution committed to promoting the physical, intellectual, and social development of all individuals. As such, CUNY seeks to prevent the abuse of drugs and alcohol, which can adversely impact performance and threaten the health and safety of students, employees, their families, and the general public. CUNY complies with all federal, state, and local laws concerning the unlawful possession, use, and distribution of drugs and alcohol.

Federal law requires that CUNY adopt and implement a pro- gram to prevent the use of illicit drugs and abuse of alcohol by students and employees. As part of its program, CUNY has adopted this policy, which sets forth (1) the standards of conduct that students and employees are expected to follow; (2) CUNY sanctions for the violation of this policy; and (3) responsibilities of the CUNY colleges/units in enforcing this policy. CUNY’s policy also (1) sets forth the procedures for disseminating the policy, as well as information about the health risks of illegal drug and alcohol use, criminal sanctions for such use, and available counseling, treatment, or rehabilitation programs, to students and employees; and

(2) Requires each college to conduct a biennial review of drug and alcohol use and prevention on its campus.

This policy applies to all CUNY students, employees and visitors when they are on CUNY property, including CUNY residence halls, as well as when they are engaged in any CUNY-sponsored activities off campus.

CUNY Standards of Conduct

The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of drugs or alcohol by anyone, on CUNY property (including CUNY residence halls), in CUNY buses or vans, or at CUNY-sponsored activities, is prohibited. In addition, CUNY employees are prohibited from illegally providing drugs or alcohol to CUNY students. Finally, no student may possess or consume alcoholic beverages in any CUNY residence hall, regardless of whether the student is of lawful age, except for students living in the Graduate School and University Center’s graduate housing facilities who may lawfully posses and consume alcoholic beverages. For purposes of this policy, a CUNY residence hall means a residence hall owned and/or operated by CUNY, or operated by a private management company on CUNY’s behalf.

In order to make informed choices about the use of drugs and alcohol, CUNY students and employees are expected to familiarize themselves with the information provided by CUNY about the physiological, psychological, and social consequences of substance abuse.

CUNY Sanctions

Employees and students who violate this policy are subject to sanctions under University policies, procedures and collective bargaining agreements, as described below. Employees and students should be aware that, in addition to these CUNY sanctions, the University will contact appropriate law enforcement agencies if they believe that a violation of the policy should also be treated as a criminal matter.

Students

Students are expected to comply with the CUNY and college policies with respect to drugs and alcohol. Any student found in violation may be subject to disciplinary action under Article 15 of the Bylaws of the Board of Trustees, which may result in sanctions up to and including expulsion from the University.

In addition, any student who resides in a CUNY residence hall and who is found to have violated any CUNY or college policy with respect to drugs and alcohol may be subject to sanctions under the CUNY Residence Hall Disciplinary Procedures, up to and including expulsion from the residence hall.

In lieu of formal disciplinary action, CUNY may, in appropriate cases, seek to resolve the matter through an agreement pursuant to which the student must see a counselor or successfully participate in a drug and alcohol treatment program.

In accordance with the Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act (“FERPA”), CUNY may also choose—when appropriate—to con- tact parents or legal guardians of students who have violated the CUNY policy on drugs and alcohol.

Employees

Any employee found to have violated this CUNY policy may be subject to disciplinary action, in accordance with the procedures set forth in applicable CUNY policies, rules, regulations, and collective bargaining agreements. Sanctions may include a reprimand, suspension without pay, or termination of employment. In lieu of formal disciplinary action, CUNY may, in appropriate cases, seek to resolve the matter through an agreement pursuant to which the employee must successfully participate in a drug or alcohol treatment program.

Responsibilities of CUNY Colleges/Units

Each college or unit of the University should make its best efforts to educate employees and students about this policy and the risks associated with the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illegal drugs and alcohol. The President of each college or unit may choose to ban alcohol at on-campus functions or at any particular function. This policy, together with information about the health risks of illegal drug and alcohol use, criminal sanctions for such use, and counseling, treatment, or rehabilitation programs available to employees or students, must be distributed annually to all employees and students. The Chief Student Affairs Officer shall be responsible for the distribution of this material to students, and the Director of Human Resources shall be responsible for the distribution of the material to employees.

The Vice President for Administration, or person performing the equivalent function at each college or unit of CUNY, shall be responsible for conducting a biennial review to determine the effectiveness of CUNY’s drug and alcohol program at its college or unit, and to ensure that sanctions for drug and alcohol violations are consistently enforced. Upon completion, the biennial review must be sent to the University’s Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Operating Officer. This biennial review must include the number of drug and alcohol-related violations and fatalities that occur on the college’s campus or as part of the college’s activities, as well as the number and type of sanctions imposed as a result of drug and alcohol-related violations and fatalities that occur at the college as part of its activities.

Adopted by CUNY Board of Trustees: June 22, 2002 and amended on May 2, 2011 (BOT May 2, 2011 Calendar Minutes: Item # 5.A.).

The City University of New York Medical Withdrawal and Re-Entry Policy and Procedures Governing Student Behavior That Presents a Direct Threat of Harm to Self or Others or Substantially Disrupts The Learning or Working Environment of Others

I.    Introduction

The City University of New York (“CUNY”) is committed to the academic success and personal growth of its students. As part of that commitment, CUNY and its constituent campuses are responsible for providing a safe learning and working environment for students, faculty, staff and other members of the University community. Some students may, because of a medical condition, engage in behavior that presents a direct threat of harm to themselves or to others, or substantially disrupts the learning or working environment of others. In such situations, the safety and security of the campus community, including the individual student, is paramount. This policy does not replace or supersede reasonable and appropriate security and health and safety measures, such as calling 911 or taking other immediate action in case of imminent threat to life or limb.

In addition to taking action to protect the security and safety of the campus community, a college may address the student’s conduct to determine if action under this policy or under the student disciplinary process is appropriate. When a student’s conduct that directly threatens or substantially disrupts the learning or working environment of others appears to relate to a medical condition, the campus may, at its option, address the student’s conduct either in accordance with this policy, or through the student disciplinary process. If the student’s conduct constitutes a threat solely to him or herself, it should be addressed under this policy rather than the disciplinary process.

I.    Policy

A.        As an alternative to disciplinary action that may be taken under Article XV of CUNY’s Bylaws, a college of CUNY may bring a proceeding to require a student to withdraw from the University, or, under some circumstances, the student’s home college and/or from residence in a college residence hall under this withdrawal policy and procedures when the student’s behavior evidences a direct threat of harm to others, or when the student’s behavior substantially disrupts the learning or working environment of others. A direct threat means a significant risk of harm to health or safety.

B.        A student who threatens to commit or attempts to commit suicide, and who does not otherwise threaten direct harm to others or substantially disrupt the learning or working environment of others, shall not be subject to disciplinary action for that threat or attempt under Article XV of the CUNY’s Bylaws. If a college determines that withdrawal of the student or retention of the student subject to specified conditions is appropriate because the student’s behavior threatens direct harm to him or herself, the procedures outlined below shall apply instead of disciplinary procedures.

C.        A student who withdraws or is withdrawn from the University, a college or college residence hall pursuant to this policy may apply for re-entry to the University, a college and/or to a college residence hall. The application for re-entry shall be made to the student’s home college’s Chief Student Affairs Officer, who shall determine whether the student still presents a direct threat of harm to him or herself or others or still presents a significant risk to substantially disrupt the learning or working environment of others. If the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee determines, based on the assessment of a qualified, licensed mental health professional, that there is not a significant risk that the behavior that required withdrawal will be repeated, he or she shall approve the student’s application for re-entry.

II.   Procedures

A.        Emergency Interim Removal

1.   If a student’s behavior presents an immediate, severe and direct threat to him or herself or others (by evidencing a likelihood of harm to him or herself or others), or is substantially disrupting the learning or working environment of others, the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee (if such Officer is not immediately available) may direct an emergency interim removal of the student that restricts the student’s access to the College’s campus or residence hall, as appropriate, for an interim period before a final determination of the matter. The Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee shall consult with the University’s Office of the General Counsel prior to making any such direction.

2.   The fact that a student has threatened to commit suicide or attempted suicide, by itself, does not allow the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee to direct an emergency interim removal. In all cases involving such students, the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee must attempt to have the student individually assessed by a mental health professional as outlined below in A.3. before deciding whether to direct an emergency interim removal.

3.   Except as permitted in III A. 1. above, before determining whether to require an emergency interim removal, the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee shall take the following steps:

a.  Exercise all reasonable efforts to meet with the student; and

b.  In that meeting, offer the student the opportunity to be evaluated at the college’s expense by a qualified, licensed mental health professional, who may be an employee of a college of CUNY or CUNY or on retainer to a college of CUNY or CUNY. Whenever possible,  that professional shall have had no prior contact with the student. The professional shall assess whether the student’s behavior presents an immediate, severe and direct threat to him or herself or others or presents a significant risk to repeat behavior that substantially disrupts the learning or working environment of others, and, if so, whether the student’s behavior may be the result of a medical issue. That professional shall present his or her findings to the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee, who shall determine based on those findings and other evidence available whether emergency interim removal under these procedures is appropriate.

c.   If the student refuses to meet, and/or refuses to under- go such assessment or to keep a scheduled appointment, the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee may require emergency interim removal without a meeting and/or mental health assessment if he or she reasonably concludes on the basis of the available evidence that the student’s behavior evidences an immediate, severe and direct threat of harm to the student or others or is substantially disrupting the working or learning environment of others and presents a significant risk to continue that substantial disruption. The Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee shall consult with the University’s Office of the General Counsel before making such a determination.

4.   The emergency interim removal from the College and/or residence hall shall remain in effect until a final decision has been made pursuant to the procedures below, unless, before a final decision is made, the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee determines that the reasons for imposing the interim removal no longer exist.

A.    Withdrawal after Emergency Interim Removal

1.   If a student has been subjected to an emergency interim removal from the college and/or residence hall, the college shall request retention with conditions or voluntary withdrawal within 7 calendar days of such removal. Should the request for retention with conditions or voluntary withdrawal request be refused, the College shall determine within 7 calendar days of such refusal whether to take further action against the student, including whether to initiate involuntary withdrawal proceedings or, disciplinary proceedings under Article XV of the CUNY Bylaws, as applicable under II A. above, and shall send notice of either such proceeding in accordance with the notice requirements of the applicable procedure within that 7-day period. For students who have been subjected to an emergency interim removal without having undergone the assessment procedures outlined in III A. 3 above, the College shall follow the assessment procedures outlined below in B.2.

a. prior to determining its course of action.

2.   In cases where the student has been subjected to an emergency interim removal without assessment, the procedure for determining whether withdrawal is appropriate is as follows:

a.     The Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee shall exercise best efforts to meet with the student to discuss the student’s behavior and to hear the student’s  explanation of the alleged behavior. If, after hearing the explanation, the Officer or designee still wishes to consider the possibility of the student’s withdrawal, he or she shall offer the student an opportunity to be evaluated, at the college’s expense, by a qualified, licensed mental health professional, who may be an employee of a college of CUNY or CUNY, or on retainer to a college of CUNY or CUNY. Whenever possible, that professional shall have had no prior contact with the student. The professional shall make findings concerning whether the student’s behavior presents a direct threat of harm to him or herself or others or presents a significant risk to repeat behavior that substantially disrupts the learning or working environment of others and if so, whether the student’s behavior may be the result of a medical issue. The professional shall report such findings to the Chief Student Affairs Officer, who shall, based on those findings, and after consultation with the University’s Office of the General Counsel, determine the appropriate action, including whether to request that the student withdraw from the University, the college and/or the college residence hall or whether to request that the student agree to specified conditions in lieu of withdrawal.

b.    If the student refuses to undergo the requested assessment, or fails to keep the scheduled appointment, and the Chief Student Affairs Officer reasonably concludes on the basis of the available evidence that the student’s behavior presents a direct threat of harm to him or herself or others or substantially disrupts the learning or working environment of others and presents a significant risk to repeat behavior that substantially disrupts the learning or working environment of others, the Chief Student Affairs Officer may request that the student voluntarily withdraw from the University, the college and/or the college residence hall. The Chief Student Affairs Officer shall consult with the University’s Office of the General Counsel before making any such request.

c.     If the student agrees to the request for voluntary withdrawal or to the specified conditions, the Chief Student Affairs officer or designee shall (i) discuss with the student the procedures for and consequences of voluntary withdrawal or the specified conditions, as applicable;

(i)     discuss the circumstances with the student’s parents or legal guardians as permissible by law and as appropriate; (iii) consult with the student’s academic advisor or department, as appropriate; (iv) consult with the residence hall director, as appropriate; (v) refer the student to appropriate resources for treatment; and (vi) advise the student concerning the process for applying for re- entry, as well as on conditions for re-entry, if applicable and appropriate.

d.    If the student does not agree to the request for voluntary withdrawal or to the specified conditions, the Chief Student Affairs Officer shall determine, in consultation with the University’s Office of the General Counsel, whether to take further action against the student, including whether to initiate involuntary withdrawal proceedings, or, in the case of students referenced in II

A.   Above, whether to initiate disciplinary proceedings under Article XV of the CUNY Bylaws.

B.        Withdrawal of Students without Emergency Interim Removal

1.   Students Who Present a Direct Threat of Harm to Others or Substantially Disrupt the Learning or Working Environment of Others

a.       Voluntary Withdrawal or Retention with Conditions

 (1)     In situations where a student’s behavior evidences a direct threat of harm to himself or others or substantially disrupts the learning or working environment of others and presents a significant risk to repeat behavior that substantially disrupts the learning or working environment of others and the Chief Student Affairs Officer reasonably believes that the student’s behavior may be connected to a medical issue, the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee may request that the student voluntarily withdraw or agree to retention under conditions.

(2)     If the student agrees to the request for voluntary withdrawal or to the specified conditions, the Chief Student Affairs officer or designee shall

(i)   Discuss with the student the procedures for  and consequences of voluntary withdrawal or the specified conditions, as applicable; (ii) discuss the circumstances with the student’s parents or legal guardians as permissible by law and as appropriate;

(iii) Consult with the student’s academic advisor or department, as appropriate; (iv) consult with the residence hall director, as appropriate; (v) refer the student to appropriate resources for treatment; and

(vi) Advise the student concerning the process for applying for re-entry, as well as on conditions for re-entry, if applicable and appropriate.

a.       Involuntary Withdrawal

(1)     If the student does not agree to the request for voluntary withdrawal or to the specified conditions, the Chief Student Affairs Officer shall determine, in consultation with the University’s Office of the General Counsel, whether to take further action against the student, including whether to initiate involuntary withdrawal proceedings or disciplinary proceedings under Article XV of the CUNY Bylaws.

(2)     Before initiating involuntary withdrawal proceedings under this procedure, the Chief Student Affairs Officer shall follow the assessment procedures out- lined above in B.2.

2.   Students Who Present a Direct Threat of Harm Solely To Themselves

a.       The College shall follow the assessment and other procedures outlined above in B.2 a.-d. in order to determine the appropriate course of action.

B.     Involuntary Withdrawal Procedures

1.   The following shall be the procedures for involuntary withdrawal:

a.       Notice of the involuntary withdrawal hearing and the time and place of the hearing shall be personally delivered or sent by the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee of the student’s home college to the student at the address appearing on the records of the College, by overnight or certified mail, by regular mail, and, for students who have a college e-mail address, to that e-mail address. Notice of at least five business days shall be given to the student in advance of the hearing unless the student consents to an earlier hearing.

b.      The notice shall contain (i) a statement of the reasons involuntary withdrawal is sought (ii) the type of withdrawal sought (from the University, the college and/or from the college residence hall); and (iii) a statement that the student has a right to present his or her side of the story, to present witnesses and evidence on his or her behalf, to cross-examine witnesses presenting evidence against the student, to remain silent without assumption of guilt, and to be represented by legal counsel or an advisor at the student’s expense.

c.       CUNY shall constitute a Health Review Panel, comprised of qualified, licensed mental health professionals employed by a college of CUNY or by CUNY, or on retainer to a college of CUNY or CUNY. CUNY’s Vice Chancellor for Student Development shall appoint the members of the Health Review Panel. Members of the Health Review Panel, in committees constituted separately for each hearing (“Health Review Committee”), shall be responsible for adjudicating all involuntary withdrawal hearings held according to these procedures. For each involuntary withdrawal hearing, the Vice Chancellor for Student Development or his designee shall constitute a three-person Health Review Committee from the Health Review Panel to adjudicate at that hearing. No member of the Health Review Committee shall have had prior contact with the student. All decisions of the Health Review Committee shall be made by majority vote.

a.       The hearing shall be closed, unless the student requests an open hearing. However, the Health Review Committee may overrule a request for an open hearing if it determines that an open hearing would be inappropriate or disruptive in light of the nature of the evidence to be presented.

b.      After the evidence is presented at the hearing, the Health Review Committee shall determine whether the College has proved, by a preponderance of the evidence, that the student’s behavior presents a direct threat of harm to him or herself or others, or has substantially disrupted the learning or working environment of others and presents a significant risk of threatening further substantial disruption of the learning or working environment of others, and if so, what the appropriate remedy should be. The Health Review Committee may also set reasonable and appropriate conditions on re-entry. The decision of the Health Review Committee shall be made within five business days from the close of the hearing.

A.        Appeals

An appeal from the decision of the Health Review Committee may be made to the President of the student’s home college or the President’s designee within thirty calendar days after the delivery of the decision appealed from. The President or designee shall make his or her determination on the appeal within fifteen business days from receipt of the appeal. The President’s decision may be appealed to the Chancellor of the University or his or her designee within thirty calendar days after the delivery of the President’s decision on appeal. The Chancellor or designee’s decision shall be made within fifteen business days from receipt of the appeal. The Chancellor (or designee’s) decision shall be final. The bases over- turning a decision of the Health Review Committee at both levels of review are limited to the following: (i) clearly erroneous factual findings; (ii) procedural irregularities; (iii) newly available evidence that would have affected the outcome; (iv) the remedy and/or conditions on re-entry were unreasonable or inappropriate..

A.        Re-Entry

1.   A student who is withdrawn from the University, a student’s home college and/or a college residence hall under this policy may be considered for re-entry.

2.   A student wishing to be considered for re-entry should contact his or her home college’s Chief Student Affairs Officer and provide appropriate documentation of behavioral change and resolution of the initial behavioral problem, including compliance with any conditions that may have been set for re-entry.

3.   A student may apply for re-entry to the University, a college and/or a college residence hall no more than one time per term.

4.   In assessing an application for re-entry, the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee shall: (i) in cases in which he or she determines that an additional mental health assessment is necessary, refer the student for assessment to a qualified, licensed mental health professional, at the College’s expense;

(i)   Receive, investigate, and examine appropriate relevant documentation, including assessments made by college- referred mental health professionals, and, if applicable, licensed treating mental health professionals; (iii) consult with the Health Review Committee, in cases in which the student’s withdrawal was adjudicated by such a Committee;

(iv) Contact the student’s parents or legal guardians as permissible by law, if appropriate; (v) provide an opportunity for the student to meet with the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee to discuss re-entry.

5.   If the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee determines, based on the evidence presented, that there is not a significant risk that the behavior that required withdrawal will be repeated, he or she shall approve the student’s application for re-entry. In such cases, the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee shall initiate the re-entry process, provide the student with written conditions for continued attendance, and inform any relevant administrators of the student’s re-entry.

6.   If the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee determines that the application for reentry should be denied, he or she shall provide the student with a written explanation of the reasons for the denial and specify when the next request for re-entry may be considered.

7.   A student may appeal the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee’s denial of reentry to the college President or designee within thirty calendar days after the delivery of the decision denying re-entry. The President or designee shall make his or her determination on the appeal within thirty calendar days from receipt of the appeal. The President’s decision may be appealed to the Chancellor of the University or his or her designee within thirty calendar days after the delivery of the President’s decision on appeal. The Chancellor or designee’s decision shall be made within thirty calendar days from receipt of the appeal. The Chancellor (or designee’s) decision shall be final. The basis for overturning a decision on appeal at either level shall be limited to a determination that the decision on re-entry was clearly erroneous.


B.        Effect on Academic Status

In the event of a withdrawal pursuant to this policy, a notation of withdrawal shall appear on the student’s transcript for all classes taken during that semester. The Chief Student Affairs Officer at a student’s home college may grant a student request that, in lieu of withdrawal, a notation of incomplete shall appear on his or her transcript for classes taken during that semester if and only if there is a reasonable prospect that the student will eventually complete such classes, subject to faculty approval for each such class. Regardless of the notation that appears on a student’s transcript, the Chief Student Affairs Officer of the student’s home college shall inform the Vice Chancellor for Student Development of the student’s withdrawal in order to effectuate a hold by the University Application Processing Center on the student’s ability to transfer or otherwise seek admission to another college of CUNY.

C.        Effect on Housing Status

If the student has been living in a college residence hall and will not be permitted to continue to do so, the student’s contract will be canceled and fees refunded on a prorated basis.

D.        Confidentiality

The results of examinations by mental health professionals to whom students are referred for assessment at any stage in the withdrawal or readmission process shall be confidential student records, except that if the results indicate that the student presents an imminent, severe, and direct threat of harm to him or herself or others, those results may be shared with the appropriate individuals in order to attempt to prevent the occurrence of such harm. The results of these examinations shall be admissible in involuntary withdrawal hearings but shall not be admissible in disciplinary hearings, unless the student places his or her health, including mental health, at issue in a disciplinary hearing.

E.        Board Review

During the fall 2009 semester, the Chancellery shall conduct a review of the experience of the colleges with these procedures and shall report the results of that review to the Board of Trustees, along with any recommended changes.

Procedures for Handling Student Complaints About Faculty Conduct in Academic Settings

I.         Introduction. The University and its Colleges have a variety of procedures for dealing with student-related issues, including grade appeals, academic integrity violations, student discipline, disclosure of student records, student elections, sexual harassment complaints, disability accommodations, and discrimination. One area not generally covered by other procedures concerns student complaints about faculty con- duct in the classroom or other formal academic settings. The University respects the academic freedom of the faculty and will not interfere with it as it relates to the content or style of teaching activities. Indeed, academic freedom is and should be of paramount importance. At the same time the University recognizes its responsibility to provide students with a procedure for addressing complaints about faculty treatment of students that are not protected by academic freedom and are not covered by other procedures. Examples might include incompetent or inefficient service, neglect of duty, physical or mental incapacity and conduct unbecoming a member of the staff.

I.         Determination of Appropriate Procedure. If students have any question about the applicable procedure to follow for a particular complaint, they should consult with the chief student affairs officer. In particular, the chief student affairs officer should advise a student if some other procedure is applicable to the type of complaint the student has.

II.       Informal Resolution. Students are encouraged to attempt to resolve complaints informally with the faculty member or to seek the assistance of the department chairperson or campus ombudsman to facilitate informal resolution.

III.     Formal Complaint. If the student does not pursue informal resolution, or if informal resolution is unsuccessful, the student may file a written complaint with the department chair- person or, if the chairperson is the subject of the complaint, with the academic dean or a senior faculty member designated by the college president. (This person will be referred to below as the Fact Finder.). Only students in a faculty member’s class or present in another academic setting where the alleged conduct occurred may file complaints against that faculty member.

A.      The complaint shall be filed within 30 calendar days of the alleged conduct unless there is good cause shown for delay, including but not limited to delay caused by an attempt at informal resolution. The complaint shall be as specific as possible in describing the conduct complained of.

B.      The Fact Finder shall promptly send a copy to the faculty member about whom the complaint is made, along with a letter stating that the filing of the complaint does not imply that any wrongdoing has occurred and that a faculty member must not retaliate in any way against a student for having made a complaint. If either the student or the faculty member has reason to believe that the department chairperson may be biased or otherwise unable to deal with the complaint in a fair and objective manner, he or she may submit to the academic dean or the senior faculty member designated by the college president a written request stating the reasons for that belief; if the request appears to have merit, that person may, in his or her sole discretion, replace the department chairperson as the Fact Finder. The chair- person may also submit a written request for recusal for good cause to the academic dean or senior faculty member designated by the college president to review such requests. If a recusal request is granted, a different department chairperson shall conduct the investigation, or, if no other chairperson is available, an administrator designated by the college president shall serve in the chairperson’s stead. Further, the college president may re-assign investigations as necessary, including but not limited to situations in which a Fact Finder has not completed an investigation in a timely manner. In addition, during any time that no department chairperson is available to investigate a complaint, the college president may assign an administrator to investigate.

C.      The Fact Finder shall meet with the complaining student and faculty member, either separately or together, to discuss the complaint and to try to resolve it. The Fact Finder may seek the assistance of the campus ombudsman or other appropriate person to facilitate informal resolution.

D.      If resolution is not possible, and the Fact Finder concludes that the facts alleged by the student, taken

as true and viewed in the light most favorable to the student, establish that the conduct complained of is clearly protected by academic freedom, he or she shall issue a written report dismissing the complaint and set- ting forth the reasons for dismissal and send a copy to the complaining student, the faculty member, the chief academic officer and the chief student affairs officer. Otherwise, the Fact Finder shall conduct an investigation. The Fact Finder shall separately interview the complaining student, the faculty member and other persons with relevant knowledge and information and shall also consult with the chief student affairs officer and, if appropriate, the college ombudsman. The Fact Finder shall not reveal the identity of the complaining student and the faculty member to others except to the extent necessary to conduct the investigation. If the Fact Finder believes it would be helpful, he or she may meet again with the student and faculty member after completing the investigation in an effort to resolve the matter. The complaining student and the faculty member shall have the right to have a representative (including a union representative, student government representative or attorney) present during the initial meeting, the interview and any post-investigation meeting.

E.      In cases where there is strong preliminary evidence that a student’s complaint is meritorious and that the student may suffer immediate and irreparable harm, the Fact Finder may provide appropriate interim relief to the complaining student pending the completion of the investigation. The affected faculty member may appeal such interim relief to the chief academic officer.

A.      At the end of the investigation, the Fact Finder shall issue a written report setting forth his or her findings and recommendations, with particular focus on whether the conduct in question is protected by academic freedom, and send a copy to the complaining student, the faculty member, the chief academic officer and the chief student affairs officer. In ordinary cases, it is expected that the investigation and written report should be completed within 30 calendar days of the date the complaint was filed.

II.       Appeals Procedure. If either the student or the faculty member is not satisfied with the report of the Fact Finder, the student or faculty member may file a written appeal to the chief academic officer within 10 calendar days of receiving  the report, which time period may be extended for good cause shown. The chief academic officer shall convene and serve as the chairperson of an Appeals Committee, which shall also include the chief student affairs officer, two faculty members elected annually by the faculty council or senate and one student elected annually by the student senate. The Appeals Committee shall review the findings and recommendations of the report, with particular focus on whether the conduct in question is protected by academic freedom. The Appeals Committee shall not conduct a new factual investigation or overturn any factual findings contained in the report unless they are clearly erroneous. If the Appeals Committee decides to reverse the Fact Finder in a case where there has not been an investigation because the Fact Finder erroneously found that the alleged conduct was protected by academic freedom, it may remand to the Fact Finder for further proceedings. The committee shall issue a written decision within 20 calendar days of receiving the appeal. A copy of the decision shall be sent to the student, the faculty member, the department chairperson and the president.

III.     Subsequent Action. Following the completion of these procedures, the appropriate college official shall decide the appropriate action, if any, to take. For example, the department chairperson may decide to place a report in the faculty member’s personnel file or the president may bring disciplinary charges against the faculty member. Disciplinary charges may also be brought in extremely serious cases even though the college has not completed the entire investigative process described above; in that case, the bringing of disciplinary charges shall automatically suspend that process. Any action taken by a college, whether interim or final, must comply with the bylaws of the University and the collective bargaining agreement between the University and the Professional Staff Congress.

IV.      Campus Implementation. Each campus shall implement these procedures and shall distribute them widely to administrators, faculty members and students and post them on the college website.

Approved by the Board of Trustees on April 26, 2010, effective May 1, 2010.


Policies of Queensborough Community College

 College Policy on Conduct

 1.   In accordance with Federal and State Law, Queensborough Community College prohibits discrimination and harassment based on race, gender, religion, color, creed, disability, sexual orientation, national origin, ancestry, age, marital or veterans’ status. Specifically a student may be disciplined for hostile conduct or behavior that might incite immediate violence. Vandalism, racist graffiti, intimidation, harassment and other forms of organized hatred will not be tolerated on campus  and violators will be punished.

2.   All students, faculty and staff are required to have in their possession a valid college ID card while on campus.

3.   All visitors must have a legitimate reason for being on campus and are required to show acceptable identification to members of the Department of Public Safety upon request.

4.   All persons on campus are required to show their college ID cards upon the request of any college employee, officer of the Queensborough Student Association or student responsible for a student event.

5.   Any person, who upon request, refuses or is unable to produce valid identification will be evicted from the campus and/or arrested for trespass.

6.   Cellular phones, beepers and all other personal electronic devices may not be used in the classroom while classes are in session.

7.   The playing of radios on campus is prohibited. Disturbing others will be considered an infraction of appropriate student conduct.

8.   The college seeks to foster an atmosphere of mutual respect and civility and expects students to demonstrate proper class- room decorum, which includes appropriate behavior and dress.

Policy On Smoking

The CUNY Tobacco Policy prohibits smoking and the use of tobacco products anywhere on or within the grounds and facilities of the campus. As of the first day of classes, Fall 2012, the following is prohibited at Queensborough Community College: (i) the use of tobacco on all grounds and facilities under CUNY jurisdiction, including indoor locations and outdoor locations such as playing fields; entrances and exits to buildings; and parking lots; (ii) tobacco industry promotions, advertising, marketing, and distribution of marketing materials on campus properties; and (iii) tobacco industry sponsorship of athletic events and athletes.

Queensborough Community College encourages all smoking employees and students to quit smoking. Smoking cessation information is available in the Office of Health Services, Medical Arts Building, Room MC-02, 718-631-6375 or from the NY Smokers’ Quit Line at 1-866-697-8487. Any questions regarding smoking policies should be directed to QCC’s Environmental Health & Safety Officer. http://policy.cuny.edu/policyimport/manual_of_generalpolicy/articleivfacilitiesplanningandmanage- ment/policy4.06tobacco/document.pdf

Health Risks Associated with Abuse of Alcohol, Use of Tobacco, and Illicit Drugs Alcohol

Alcohol (ethanol) is toxic to the human body. It is a central nervous system depressant which slows bodily functions such as heart rate, pulse, and respiration. Taken in large quantities, it progressively causes intoxication, sedation, and unconsciousness (even death, if consumed in large amounts). These effects are similar to those produced by other sedative-hypnotic drugs such as barbiturates and narcotics.

Alcoholics may be able to consume large quantities of alcohol without appearing to be drunk or uncontrolled. Nevertheless, alcoholism causes severe emotional, physical, and psychological damage. Prolonged heavy drinking can damage various organs, resulting in disorders such as cirrhosis of the liver, heart disease, pancreatitis and cancer. It can also lead to gastrointestinal irritation (nausea, diarrhea, gastritis, ulcers), malnutrition, sexual dysfunctions, high blood pressure, lowered resistance to disease, and possible irreversible brain and nervous system damage. Alcoholism also leads to a wide variety of problems involving one’s emotional, family, work, and social life.

Alcohol Impairs Driving

Even small amounts of alcohol impair driving ability. In your body, alcohol is quickly absorbed into the bloodstream. The liver is able to break down the alcohol at a rate of about one ounce per hour. Alcohol in excess of that amount stays in the bloodstream and affects these brain functions involved in driving:

  • Judgment – Alcohol alters your perception. It makes you overconfident and encourages you to take reckless chances.

  • Coordination – Your reaction time and ability to perform multiple tasks decrease with alcohol.

  • Vision – Alcohol decreases your pupil reaction time, depth perception, and peripheral vision.

Tobacco

It is illegal to sell tobacco products to any person under the age of twenty-one in the State of New York. The City University of New York has adopted a tobacco-free policy which prohibits the use of tobacco on University premises.

Forty-eight years ago the first report of the Surgeon General of the United States was issued on the impact of tobacco use on health. This 1964 report presented stark conclusions: that cigarette- smoking causes lung cancer and is the most important cause of chronic bronchitis. The report also linked tobacco smoking with emphysema and other forms of cancer. The tobacco industry contested the report, arguing that there was no conclusive link between smoking and poor health. Since that time, however, the evidence supporting the conclusions reached in that landmark report has continued to mount.

The Department of Health and Human Services, the American Psychiatric Association and the World Health Organization have determined that nicotine, the chief component of tobacco, is a highly addictive drug.

Cannabis (Marijuana)–Effects

All forms of cannabis have negative physical and mental effects. Several regularly observed physical effects of cannabis are a substantial increase in the heart rate, bloodshot eyes, a dry mouth and throat, and increased appetite.

Use of cannabis may impair or reduce short-term memory and comprehension, alter sense of time, and reduce ability to perform tasks requiring concentration and coordination, such as driving a car. Research also shows that students do not retain knowledge when they are “high.” Motivation and cognition may be altered, making the acquisition of new information difficult. Marijuana can also produce paranoia and psychosis.

Because users often inhale the unfiltered smoke deeply and then hold it in their lungs as long as possible, marijuana is damaging to the lungs and pulmonary system. Marijuana smoke contains more cancer-causing agents than tobacco.

Long-term users of cannabis may develop psychological dependence and require more of the drug to get the same effect. The drug can become the center of their lives.

Many people mistakenly believe driving under the influence of marijuana is safer than driving on alcohol. But marijuana significantly slows your reaction time, decreases your ability to judge speed and distance, and impairs your coordination. It also decreases your visual acuity. The effects may last 4-10 hours, even after the feeling of being “high” is gone.

 

Alcohol and Drugs

The college recognizes that students are adults and expects them to obey the law and adhere to college regulations. All students must take personal responsibility for their own actions and behavior.

The college has established policies regarding the consumption of alcohol and the use of illegal drugs, narcotics and other controlled substances, and supports federal, state and local laws regarding their usage.

Policy on Possession/Use of Alcoholic Beverages

  1. The unlawful possession, use or distribution of alcohol by students and employees on college property or as a part of any college activity is prohibited.

  2. No student or student organization is permitted to serve alcoholic beverages on this campus.

  3. No alcoholic beverages are to be brought on this campus for any reason unless approved in advance and in writing by the Department for Student Affairs.

  4. It is also the policy of The City University of New York and of this college that: Any actions or behaviors which recklessly or intentionally endanger mental or physical health or involve the forced consumption of liquor or drugs for the purpose of initiation or affiliation with any organization is prohibited.

The legal drinking age in New York State is 21 and underage drinking is strictly prohibited. It is also unlawful to sell or give away alcohol to anyone under the age of 21. In addition to college disciplinary action, violators will also be subject to criminal prosecution.

Policy on Illegal Possession and Use of Drugs

  1. The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, sale or use of marijuana, illegal drugs or other controlled substances by college students or employees on college premises or as a part of any college activity is prohibited. Violators will be subject to campus disciplinary sanctions, as well as criminal prosecution.

  2. Non-college personnel apprehended on campus for any alcohol or drug violation will be subject to arrest and criminal prosecution.

  3. Since this campus is in no sense a sanctuary, outside law enforcement officials may, on their own initiative, take such action as they deem necessary and appropriate.

  4. For the purpose of this policy, the campus is understood to be all facilities in which this college conducts, administers and is responsible for college business.

 

Student Parking on Campus

Although parking on campus is limited, registered QCC students are eligible to park on campus on a SPACE AVAILABLE BASIS. Students can pay for parking by utilizing their QCC One Card by which they can deposit funds in their Tiger Bucks account for parking on campus in Lots 2 & 6. Lots 1, 3 & 4 are reserved for Faculty & Staff parking only. Students are allowed to park in Lot 1 after 5:00 pm using their OneCard.

Funds may be deposited to students’ accounts at the OneCard stations in the following locations: Administration Building, first floor; Library Building, 2nd floor; Student Union, Lower Level. Funds can also be deposited online at: www.qcc.cuny.edu/onecard

Parking Violation Penalties

During any one semester or summer session, penalties for an infraction of the parking rules and regulations are as follows:

  • First violation $15.00

  • Second violation $20.00

  • Third violation $25.00 and possible cancellation of parking privileges and/or disciplinary action.

Please feel free to stop by the Public Safety Office and pick up a Parking & Traffic Control Regulations brochure for further details about parking on campus.

NOTICE OF ACCESS TO CAMPUS CRIME STATISTICS, THE ANNUAL SECURITY REPORT, AND INFORMATION ON REGISTERED SEX OFFENDERS

In accordance with the provisions of the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act) Queensborough Community College’s Annual Security Report (ASR) includes statistics for the previous three calendar years concerning reported crimes that occurred on campus and on public property within or immediately adjacent to and accessible from campus. The statistics must be gathered from campus public safety, local law enforcement and other school officials (Campus Security Authorities) who have ”significant responsibility for student and campus activities” such as Student Affairs and Student Judicial Affairs directors. The report also includes institutional policies concerning campus security issues, such as those concerning alcohol and drug use, crime prevention, reporting crimes, sexual assault and other relevant matters. Campus crime statistics and the campus’s Annual Security Report are available at the Public Safety Office or by accessing their website at http:// www.qcc.cuny.edu/publicsafety. Crime statistics are also available through the U.S. Department of Education’s website: https://ope. ed.gov/campussafety/#/institution/search.

The Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act of 2000 (CSCPA) requires institutions of higher education to issue a statement advising the campus community where law enforcement information provided by a state concerning registered sex offenders may be obtained. It also requires sex offenders already required to register in a state to provide notice, as required under state law, of each institution of higher education of that state at which the person is employed, carries on a vocation, volunteers services or is a student. The New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) maintains a registry of convicted sex offenders which is available to local law enforcement agencies, including CUNY’s Public Safety Departments. To obtain information about a Level 2 or Level 3 registered sex offender you may contact the police department in the jurisdiction in which the offender resides and/or in which the college is located. Queensborough Community College is located within the confines of NYPD’s 111pct. They can be contacted at (718) 279-5200. You may also contact the Director of Public Safety at (718) 631-6320 or call the Division’s sex offender registry at 1-800- 262-3257. To obtain information about Level 3 offenders only, you may contact the Division’s sex offender registry website: www.criminaljustice.ny.gov/nsor and then click on “Search for Level 3 Sex Offenders” or access the Division’s Level 3 sub directory electronically or via CD-ROM at the colleges public safety department or the local law enforcement agency for the jurisdiction in which the offender resides.

Computer User Responsibilities

The computer resources (1)  of The City University of New York (CUNY) and Queensborough Community College (QCC) must be used in a manner that is consistent with the College’s and University’s education purposes and environment. All users of computer resources are expected to act in a spirit of mutual respect and cooperation, and to adhere to the regulations for their use set forth in this document.

The rules of conduct for computer use include, but are not limited to, the list below. Interpretation of the rules of conduct will be addressed by QCC’s Executive Director of Information Technology (IT), and the Vice President for Finance and Administration, as appropriate. As a user of CUNY/QCC computer resources:

  • You must have a valid authorized account to use computer resources that require one, and may use only those computer resources that are specifically authorized. You may use your account in accordance with its authorized purposes and may not use an unauthorized account for any purpose.

  • You are responsible for the safeguarding of your computer account. You should change your password frequently and should not disclose it to anyone. You should take all necessary precautions in protecting the account, no matter what type of computer resources you are using.

  • You may not circumvent system protection facilities.

  • You may not knowingly use any system to produce system failure or degraded performance. Chain letters are prohibited.

  • You may not engage in unauthorized duplication, alteration or destruction of data, programs, or software. You may not transmit or disclose data, programs, or software belonging to others. You may not duplicate copyrighted materials.

  • Intrusion into private files, obtaining or spreading programs or files that can cause damage to any computer files or the operation of the computer system, or wasting the resources (people, capacity, computing) of these facilities is prohibited.

  • You may not engage in abusive or improper use of computer hardware. This includes, but is not limited to, tampering with equipment, unauthorized attempts at repairing equipment, and unauthorized removal of equipment components.

  • Users must not destroy the integrity of information available here and at other sites. All programs and data files stored on Queensborough Community College computing facilities are presumed to be private and confidential. Users must not compromise the privacy of any other user in any way.

  • Access to electronic communications services such as electronic mail (both local and off-campus) and the Internet is a privilege that must be used with intelligence and discretion. Improper use of this privilege includes but is not limited to wasting computing resources, attempting to gain unauthorized access to communication resources, harassing other users by sending or accessing annoying, obscene, libelous or threatening messages, and displaying questionable textual or graphical information within CUNY/QCC or beyond via its network facilities.

  • Computer resources are provided for CUNY and QCC-related purposes. You may not use computer resources for private purposes, including but not limited to, the use of computer resources for profit-making or illegal purposes. Solicitation for commercial or partisan political purposes is prohibited.

  • Users should immediately disclose to the Executive Director of Information Technology any unauthorized computer activity and cooperate with system administrators in their operation of the computer system and investigation of abuse.

  • The use of College computer resources may be subject to College regulations and you are expected to be familiar with those regulations. College regulations are subject to revision. You are expected to be familiar with any revisions to the College regulations.

 CUNY and Queensborough reserve the right to monitor, under appropriate conditions, all data contained in the system to protect the integrity of the system and to ensure compliance with regulations. The College is capable of accessing, reviewing, and recording:

  1. Access to the system, including successful and failed login attempts and logouts;

  2. Inbound and outbound file transfers;

  3. Terminal connections to and from external systems;

  4. Sent and received e-mail messages;

  5. Web sites visited, including uniform resource locator (URL) of pages retrieved;

  6. Date, time, and user associated with each event.

 Any user who is found to be in violation of these rules shall be subject to the following:

  1. Suspension and/or termination of computer privileges;

  2. Disciplinary action by appropriate College and/or University officials;

  3. Referral to law enforcement authorities for criminal prosecution;

  4. Other legal action, including action to recover civil damages and penalties.

(1) Computer Resources is an inclusive term referring to any and all computing/information technology, hardware, software and access. Hardware includes, but is not limited to, terminals, personal computers, workstations, printers, mice, monitors, cabling, peripheral devices. Software includes, but is not limited to, mainframe shared software, networked software and stand-alone software residing on personal computers. Access includes, but is not limited to, accounts on time sharing systems as well as access to stand-alone personal computer systems and other relevant technology such as e-mail and the Internet.